News

3D depiction of the production of steroid hormones, BPA

Flaws’ BPA Research Inspires YouTube Video

May 12, 2015 / Comparative Biosciences News

A group of undergraduate students at the University of Pennsylvania recently created a video influenced by Dr. Jodi Flaws, professor of comparative biosciences at Illinois. Dr. Flaws specializes in research involving factors such as toxicants that can affect the female reproductive system. One of Dr. Flaws’ recent research projects looked at how bisphenol A (BPA),...

BPA Mice Fertility

BPA Exposure in Pregnant Mice Affects Fertility in Three Generations

Apr 16, 2015 / Comparative Biosciences News

When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. BPA exposure during pregnancy was associated with reproductive problems...

Pamela Wilkins and Maureen McMichael with a horse, blood clotting researchers

Study Points to New Standards for Evaluating Blood Clotting in Horses

Apr 10, 2015 / Practitioner Updates

Standards are needed for tests used to check for clotting ability in the blood of various species Two Illinois faculty members who are boarded in veterinary emergency and critical care recently published their findings showing that the blood of horses differs substantially from that of humans and dogs when a diagnostic tool called thromboelastometry is...

[Dr. Elizabeth Driskell and Clyde, a golden retriever, in an exam room]

Seeking a Faster Way to Catch the Kennel Cough Culprit

Apr 8, 2015 / Pathobiology

A cough, runny nose, fever, and lethargy. In dogs, these are classic signs of highly infectious upper respiratory problems that are lumped under the broad term “kennel cough.” The specific pathogen causing kennel cough may be viral, bacterial, or a combination of these. Because many different pathogens cause kennel cough, laboratory testing is required to...

[Dr. Jodi Flaws at a microscope]

The Phthalate DEHP Undermines Female Fertility in Mice

Mar 30, 2015 / Comparative Biosciences News

Two studies in mice add to the evidence that the phthalate DEHP, a plasticizing agent used in auto upholstery, baby toys, building materials and many other consumer products, can undermine female reproductive health, in part by disrupting the growth and function of the ovaries. In the first study, reported in the journal Reproductive Toxicology, researchers...

[slide showing infected cell producing interferons]

Taking Aim at Arteriviruses: Targets for a Better Vaccine

Mar 12, 2015 / Pathobiology

Arteriviruses in pigs, horses, mice, and apes appear to use the same non-specific protein to evade the body’s immune system From the common cold to HIV, many illnesses—in fact, more than 90 percent of human illnesses—are caused by viruses. In the war against viruses, medical researchers called virologists are constantly seeking new avenues of attack. Vaccinations...

[Hergenrother and Fan]

Cancer Drug First Tested in Pet Dogs Begins Human Trials

Feb 26, 2015 / Research News

A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma. “The compound was discovered and is...

[Adam Ahlers and Mark Mitchell]

Muskrats and Minks Harbor Toxoplasmosis, a Cat Disease

Jan 29, 2015 / Research News

A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways. Researchers found antibodies for Toxoplasma gondii, the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, in 18 of 30 muskrats and 20 of 26 minks tested for the disease in central...

[Multidisciplinary team studies endometriosis]

New Drug Compounds Show Promise against Endometriosis

Jan 21, 2015 / Comparative Biosciences News

Two new drug compounds – one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis – appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine. The researchers hope to eventually use the new compounds and others like...