News

Faculty Spotlight: Annette McCoy, DVM, PhD, DACVS

May 1, 2015 / Practitioner Updates

Annette McCoy, an assistant professor of equine surgery, joined the Veterinary Teaching Hospital in January 2015. Her research focuses on genetic susceptibility and risk factors for orthopedic diseases in horses. What is your favorite thing about being a veterinary equine surgeon? I really enjoy the variety of different cases we see—both lameness/orthopedic and soft tissue...

[Chicago dog outdoors]

Update on Canine Influenza Outbreak

Apr 21, 2015 / General News

Illinois dog owners should minimize their dog’s exposure to other dogs, if at all possible. Update, May 26: Researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine explored the question of whether the canine influenza vaccines available in the United States are protective against the newly emerged strain by comparing the two viral strains at the genetic...

Pamela Wilkins and Maureen McMichael with a horse, blood clotting researchers

Study Points to New Standards for Evaluating Blood Clotting in Horses

Apr 10, 2015 / Practitioner Updates

Standards are needed for tests used to check for clotting ability in the blood of various species Two Illinois faculty members who are boarded in veterinary emergency and critical care recently published their findings showing that the blood of horses differs substantially from that of humans and dogs when a diagnostic tool called thromboelastometry is...

[Dr. Elizabeth Driskell and Clyde, a golden retriever, in an exam room]

Seeking a Faster Way to Catch the Kennel Cough Culprit

Apr 8, 2015 / Pathobiology

A cough, runny nose, fever, and lethargy. In dogs, these are classic signs of highly infectious upper respiratory problems that are lumped under the broad term “kennel cough.” The specific pathogen causing kennel cough may be viral, bacterial, or a combination of these. Because many different pathogens cause kennel cough, laboratory testing is required to...

Faculty Spotlight: Kenneth Welle, DVM, ABVP (Avian)

Sep 1, 2014 / Practitioner Updates

Dr. Kenneth Welle, who for many years had lectured and supervised students while a local practitioner, joined the clinical faculty full time in 2011. What is your favorite thing about being an exotic animal veterinarian? The existing literature and knowledge base in exotic animal practice is so much smaller than in dogs and cats, and...

[bunnies in a box]

Non-Obstructive Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders of Rabbits

Sep 1, 2014 / Practitioner Updates

By Julia Whittington, DVM Because of the unique anatomical and physiological characteristics of rabbits’ digestive process, a high-fiber diet is essential for their normal motility and GI health. It’s important for owners to provide grass hay ad libitum and to watch for signs of GI disorders (decreased appetite, diarrhea, decreased stool production, lethargy, abnormal stance, and...

[three white domestic rabbits in a pen under six UV lights]

Shining Some (UV) Light on Rabbit Husbandry

Sep 1, 2014 / Practitioner Updates

By Mark A. Mitchell DVM, MS, PhD, DECZM (Herpetology)  Rabbits are popular pets, with 3.2 million in U.S. households, according to a 2012 AVMA survey. Veterinarians should be prepared to help educate their clients about best practices for rabbit husbandry. Rabbits’ lighting needs have not been explored in depth. Rabbits evolved to be crepuscular (active...

Faculty Spotlight: Jackie Wypij, DVM, DACVIM

Jul 1, 2014 / Practitioner Updates

Dr. Jackie Wypij completed an internship and residency at Illinois and joined the oncology faculty five years ago. What have you lectured or published about recently? I gave presentations on “Contraindications in Oncology” and “Drug repositioning: Evidence for anti-cancer effect of non-cancer drugs” at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum in Nashville in...

[Tim Fan with a canine patient and vet tech Rebecca Kamerer.]

Illinois Cancer Team Investigates New Treatment Approach for Osteosarcoma

Jul 1, 2014 / Practitioner Updates

By Tim Fan, DVM, PhD, DACVIM The oncology service at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital combines researchers and clinicians focused on discovering and implementing new approaches to treating cancer in animals, especially canine osteosarcoma (OS), the most common primary bone tumor in dogs. The majority of dogs with OS eventually develop metastatic disease. While conventional therapies...

[Kim Knap talks with a client]

Client Communication: A Procedure You Can Master

Jul 1, 2014 / Practitioner Updates

By Laura Garrett, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology)  Studies have documented many ways the practitioner’s communication skills benefit the patient, the client, and the practice. Communication improves history taking, which leads to better diagnoses. Human medical studies show that good communication improves understanding of and adherence to recommendations, improves loyalty and satisfaction (which improves clinical outcomes), and decreases malpractice risk....