Pet Columns

[deuces walking 2 days after surgery]

I-Loc: Bone Fracture Repair Option Comes to Illinois

Nov 12, 2019 / Advances in Medicine / Small Animal Surgery / Dogs

Two Days After Surgery Deuces Was Walking Dr. Danielle Marturello, a clinical assistant professor of orthopedic surgery, brought an innovative option for fracture repair with her when she recently joined the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine faculty. Meet Deuces Deuces, a two-year-old male pit bull, came to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Urbana...

[white persian cat]

Grant-Funded Study Investigates Care for Brachycephalic Cats

Jul 1, 2019 / Advances in Medicine / Small Animal Surgery / Cats

The Future Is Feline Bulldogs, pugs, Boston terriers, and exotic cats with their squishy little faces…. They’re cute, they’ve got big personalities, and sometimes they snore. What many don’t realize is that this cuteness comes with a price tag: brachycephalic syndrome. Brachycephalic syndrome is a pathological condition in short-nosed dogs and cats. These animals have...

[Rex the police dog goes home from the hospital]

Police Dog’s Twisted Spleen a Serious Problem

Nov 6, 2017 / Emergency/Critical Care / Small Animal Surgery

Splenic Torsion Requires Surgery For about a week in early September, Rex, a canine officer with the Decatur Police Department, had been lethargic and not himself. His handler took Rex several times to see the local veterinarian, who, after obtaining abdominal radiographs that were concerning for a splenic issue, recommended a trip to the emergency...

[the shelter medicine mobile surgical unit at the University of Illinois]

Sorting the Science on Spay and Neuter Surgeries

Sep 11, 2017 / Preventive Health / Small Animal Surgery / Dogs

It’s almost always best to spay and neuter pets By far the most common surgeries performed on dogs in the United States are spay and neuter procedures—collectively called gonadectomies—that remove the reproductive organs to prevent unwanted pregnancies and pet overpopulation. But while these surgeries are common, they are not without controversy. Misconceptions and concerns about...

[Sonny, a French bulldog, in the University of Illinois veterinary hospital]

New Hope for Pets with Brachycephalic Syndrome

Aug 26, 2017 / Advances in Medicine / Small Animal Surgery / Cats / Dogs

Illinois first in U.S. to offer procedure Brachycephalic syndrome: it’s a medical term for a variety of anatomical problems that sometimes obstruct the airways in pugs, bulldogs, and other pets (even cats!) with flat faces. Brachycephalic syndrome is seen in brachycephalic dogs, which are dogs that have been bred for incredibly short noses. (The word...

[surgery using the fluorescent technology to detect cancer cells]

Technology Advances Diagnosis of Head and Neck Cancers in Dogs

Aug 21, 2017 / Advances in Medicine / Cancer Care / Small Animal Surgery / Dogs

This technology monitors for spread of tumors A pet’s cancer diagnosis triggers owners’ emotional strain, confusion, and uncertainty about treatment and financial decisions. Thankfully, with the help of engineers and veterinarians at the University of Illinois, cancer detection and treatment in pets—and people—is advancing at rapid speed. One of the many studies currently taking place...

[tplo rottweiler]

From CCL Tears to TPLO Repairs

Apr 17, 2017 / Advances in Medicine / Small Animal Surgery / Dogs

Rottweilers and Mastiffs are prone to CCL rupture In the NBA and the NFL, a torn ACL—anterior cruciate ligament—is an all-too-common injury. That same injury frequently afflicts dogs (even ones that aren’t athletes), but in dogs it is called a CCL rupture. The CCL, or cranial cruciate ligament, is the main supporting ligament in a...

[veterinary anesthesiologists - Lynelle Graham]

Veterinary Anesthesiologists: They’re Not Just for Surgeries

Feb 27, 2017 / Pain Management / Small Animal Surgery / Birds / Cats / Dogs / Exotics / Horses / Small Mammals

Other roles: ensure lifelong comfort and health Anesthesia—a controlled state of unconsciousness, almost like induced sleep—is used during a variety of veterinary procedures to ensure that the patient doesn’t feel pain, remains still, and is unaware of what is happening around them. While all veterinarians are educated to safely anesthetize their patients, some go on...