Meet the WMC Summer Interns!

Every summer, the Wildlife Medical Clinic student volunteer base leave campus for their own adventures and learning opportunities. With the summer being our busiest season, we still have plenty of animals to take care of during this period. So, who takes care of all the animals? The WMC student managers and a handful of veterinary student summer interns take on that task! We interviewed this year’s four summer interns about their experiences and the Wildlife Medical Clinic.

Selena Harrison, third-year veterinary student

Why did you apply for the internship at the Wildlife Medical Clinic?

I was a team leader in the clinic this past year and loved helping teach other students about the clinic and about medicine. However, I wanted to take this summer to further my own learning and thought this internship would be my best opportunity.

What is your favorite wildlife species? Continue reading

Lifestyles of the Enriched and Famous

We have several permanent animal ambassadors at the Wildlife Medical Clinic. These individuals provide special opportunities for our volunteers and the community to connect with these animals and spread a message of conservation. Most began their time with us as patients in the Wildlife Medical Clinic, and due to the extent of their injuries they could no longer survive in the wild. We spend time each day monitoring all aspects of their health, building trusting relationships, and enriching their lives.

We have the privilege to work with great faculty veterinarians who mentor our student volunteers. WMC volunteers are trained by veterinarians how to do daily examinations of each Animal Ambassador, keeping their specific needs in mind. The veterinarians themselves also regularly perform thorough examinations of each animal. For example, an important part of bird health is the length of their beak and talons. In the wild, the hard work of catching prey and seeking shelter helps birds wear down their continuously growing beak and talons. When overgrown, the bird can have a difficult time eating and even injure themselves. Our Animal Ambassadors have their beaks and talons trimmed as needed, often every other month.

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How ready for orphaned wildlife are you?

The Wildlife Medical Clinic is typically bustling with baby animals each spring. Sometimes these animals never actually needed to be rescued, however. You can help with that! By being able to tell which babies are safe with mom in their nest and which need our care, you can be their best advocates. Thanks to our knowledgeable community members – like you! – we are able to keep as many baby animals in the wild with their parents, giving them the best chances possible for a long and healthy life.

Take this quiz to make sure you feel ready for the spring rush! Continue reading