How ready for orphaned wildlife are you?

The Wildlife Medical Clinic is typically bustling with baby animals each spring. Sometimes these animals never actually needed to be rescued, however. You can help with that! By being able to tell which babies are safe with mom in their nest and which need our care, you can be their best advocates. Thanks to our knowledgeable community members – like you! – we are able to keep as many baby animals in the wild with their parents, giving them the best chances possible for a long and healthy life.

Take this quiz to make sure you feel ready for the spring rush! Continue reading

Undergraduate Volunteer Interviews

A majority of the individuals who work in the Wildlife Medical Clinic are current University of Illinois veterinary students. However, a not-enough-talked-about aspect in our clinic is the incredible undergraduate program that allows students hand-on experience prior to attending veterinary school! Our undergraduate volunteers are an irreplaceable asset to our entire team. These amazing students make the trek all the way to the vet school campus to assist with orphan care, patient treatments, pager shifts, and everything in between. We wanted to take the time to spotlight just a couple of the students in this program and see what they like about volunteering in the WMC. Take a look at what they had to say below!

Lindsay Dwyer

Q: What has been your favorite part of being in the Wildlife Medical Clinic?

My favorite part of being in WMC is getting exposed to knowledge that I wouldn’t learn through undergrad classes. Learning from vet med professors, team leaders/members and from the patients has made me feel much more prepared for my future. Continue reading

Diagnostics in the clinic

When a patient is brought to the Wildlife Medical Clinic, we have a multitude of options for diagnostic testing. Many of our patients undergo blood tests and radiographs (x-rays), but our options don’t stop there! Our Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory is equipped to process any number of samples, including swabs, blood, and biopsied tissue. Having the expertise of laboratory technicians and pathologists means we can optimize the value of every sample we collect. Because we are in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, we can also utilize equipment like ultrasound, CT (computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and endoscopy. In addition to these modalities, we have the invaluable expertise of veterinarians trained to utilize them and eager to teach all of us students how to do the same. Here’s a little bit of information that helps us decide when to utilize different diagnostic tools and tests. Continue reading