New Golf Cart!

New cage setup for a Turkey Vulture

Dr. Reich, foreground L, investigates a Turkey Vulture’s external fixator. Kara, background, unpacks and organizes supplies during the move.

If you’ve been keeping up with our social media this summer, you’ve noticed that we’ve relocated to a new (temporary) location! While this new space is much larger, and it’s already feeling like home, it is also further away from our intake area.

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10 Days of Odin

If you haven’t already heard, it’s Odin’s twentieth “clinic birthday”! Help him help our patients by donating for his 20th Birthday Bash at our online fundraising site.

On August 15, 1997, an emaciated juvenile red-tailed hawk made its way to the Wildlife Medical Clinic. Emergency fluid administration via an intraosseous catheter saved his life, and he came to be called “Odin”. With careful attention and diligent husbandry, Odin spent the following months healing and gaining weight and muscle.

However, as with any procedure, the catheterization that saved his life had its risks. An intra-osseous catheter is placed at the joint and goes into the bone marrow – in our most critical patients, this method is the fastest and most efficient method for pumping life-saving fluids into the body. However, if infected, joint problems are permanent and potentially fatal. In Odin’s case, his joint infection was caught early and was treated promptly, but resulted in lasting arthritis in the wing joint that permanently inhibited natural mobility. As hawks, like most bird species, require full range-of-motion in their wings for proper flight and, especially, swift hunting, Odin would never survive in the wild.

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Summer at the WMC: Red-Tailed Hawk

This account is by Katelyn Bagg, a rising third year veterinary student and one of the clinic’s full-time summer interns.

Working in a wildlife clinic on a daily basis is an adventure, as you never know what you will be presented with. We take everything from a litter of baby bunnies to an emergency hit-by-car raccoon, so we always have to be prepared. The summer is a busy season. It is always bustling in the clinic and there are constant opportunities to try new things and to learn.

Katelyn ensuring a new patient with neurologic and motor symptoms is able to chew and swallow its food normally.

Interns are in the clinic almost every day, giving us the opportunity to follow cases from intake to the resolution of symptoms. It is one of the most rewarding feelings to get to release a patient you have worked with, which is exactly what I got to do for a juvenile red tailed hawk that came in this June.

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