Weasels and Minks

Adult

Find a sick or injured adult weasel or mink? Do not attempt to touch or pick it up. Weasels and minks see humans as predators, and will act defensively if they feel that they are in danger. If the animal is not running away from you, but you cannot see any apparent injuries just by looking at it, take a box and cut a hole in one of the sides. Cover the animal with the box, and leave the animal be for a little while; the box will allow the animal to have some privacy, while the hole will allow for airflow (if it is hot outside), as well as a place for the animal to escape if it chooses to. You could also provide a small bowl of water and some wet dog or cat food near the box if you wish.

Keep an eye on the animal for a couple of hours. If the animal is sill under the box after a couple of hours have passed, and/or if it is injured, call your local wildlife clinic or rehabilitation facility and wait for help to arrive. If you need to transport the animal yourself, take a towel-lined box, with some small airholes poked in, and gently scoop the animal into the box using an object like a bowl or a brush. Do not touch the animal yourself, and do this carefully–we don’t want to make any injuries worse! After you have done so, securely close the box so that the animal does not escape in your car, and take the animal straight to your local wildlife clinic or rehabilitator.

Baby Weasels or Beavers (Kits)

If you have found a litter of kits, or a single kit, watch it for a little bit, from a distance, to see if mom comes around. If you don’t see mom come around after watching for about a day, then action needs to be taken. Are the kits’ eyes open? If not, they need to be taken to a wildlife clinic or rehabilitator immediately. Do not attempt to keep or raise the kits on your own. Kits have special nutritional and caretaking needs that only a trained professional can attend to. Additionally, not only is it illegal to keep kits, but kits raised by humans do not adapt well to captivity; they also do not survive well in the wild if released from captivity.  Remember, as cute as these animals can be, they are wild animals and not domestic pets.

If the kits are moving around and have open eyes, they will likely be fine on their own.  The only time that you should intervene, in this case, is if a kit is injured or visibly sick. In this case, call your local wildlife clinic or rehabilitator for assistance and keep an eye on the animal until help arrives. If you need to transport the animal on your own, use a bowl or brush to gently scoop the animal into a towel-lined box with some air holes. Do this carefully–we don’t want to make any injuries worse! Do not attempt to touch or pick up the animal yourself unless absolutely necessary. If you do, wear gloves. After you have the animal safely and securely in the box, take the animal straight to your local wildlife clinic or rehabilitator.