Wildlife Baby Shower Featured on WCIA Local News

To view the news clip, Click Here

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS — Spring means time for more newborn wild animals. That means people will bring them to the UI’s Wildlife Medical Clinic if they think they’re orphans, like these baby squirrels. Workers will treat the animals but say sometimes they don’t always need our help.

There’s a chance they weren’t even abandoned. To learn more, the clinic is holding a Wildlife Baby Shower. They’ll explain what to do when you find an orphaned animal. The workshop is free and open to the public.

Wildlife Baby Shower
Prairieland Feeds, Savoy
Saturday, April 4
11 am & 1 pm
Free workshop

Walk on the Wild Side- ciLiving Spotlight

The Wildlife Medical Clinic’s Walk  was recently featured on the c i Living network! Check out the video here:

http://www.illinoishomepage.net/ciliving-stories/d/story/walk-on-the-wild-side-benefit/29429/BuHIHUIVm0iB0xkeKKQdgg

Take a “Walk on the Wild Side” in support of local wildlife and tomorrow’s veterinarians. You will have a chance to bid on adventure packages, animal encounters, and outstanding art including one-of-a-kind animal art! The Clinic’s own resident hawks and owls will be in attendance too! New to the program this year, we will have a Bird of Prey Program with a flight demonstration!

That Cuddly Kitty Is Deadlier Than You Think

Photo by James Morton

“In a report that scaled up local surveys and pilot studies to national dimensions, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that domestic cats in the United States — both the pet Fluffies that spend part of the day outdoors and the unnamed strays and ferals that never leave it — kill a median of 2.4 billion birds and 12.3 billion mammals a year, most of them native mammals like shrews, chipmunks and voles rather than introduced pests like the Norway rat.

The estimated kill rates are two to four times higher than mortality figures previously bandied about, and position the domestic cat as one of the single greatest human-linked threats to wildlife in the nation. More birds and mammals die at the mouths of cats, the report said, than from automobile strikes, pesticides and poisons, collisions with skyscrapers and windmills and other so-called anthropogenic causes.”

Read the full article at The New York Times