Continuing Education

Fall Conference for Veterinarians

FC 2016September 22-23, 2016

iHotel and Conference Center
1900 S. First St.
Champaign, IL

REGISTER

Future dates:

October 26-27, 2017
October 11-12, 2018
September 19-20, 2019

 

2016 CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

  • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2016

    1:00-1:50 p.m.Overview of Foreign Animal, USDA Program, and Reportable DiseasesSuzett K. HexumThis module introduces readers to a variety of foreign animal, USDA Program and reportable diseases and contains a list of which diseases are applicable to Category I and Category II accredited veterinarians. Information about reporting diseases and the steps in a foreign animal disease investigation are provided. Details about additional training opportunities for accredited veterinarians are also included along with a multitude of resources and learning opportunities to stay informed about these diseases.1.0USDA APHIS, VS.
    2:00-2:50 p.m.Sheep and Goats: Disease Awareness and Health CertificatesSuzett K. HexumThis module begins with an overview of the sheep and goat industries and a review of eight diseases that impact the industry. Veterinarians should be aware of these important conditions, especially when inspecting animals prior to interstate or international movement. The National Scrapie Eradication and the Scrapie Flock Certification programs are reviewed highlighting the genetic components and identification requirements. Finally, examples of properly completed health certificates for sheep and goats are provided to help veterinarians avoid common errors that can lead to delays or refusal of entry for their client’s animals.1.0USDA APHIS, VS.
     2:50-3:10 p.m.Break
     3:10-4:00 p.m. Avian Influenza (AI) and Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) Suzett K. HexumThis module helps veterinarians understand the economic and public health impact of an exotic avian disease outbreak and to better recognize the clinical signs associated with AI and END. Details relating to collecting and submitting samples for the surveillance as well as reporting positive results for AI or END are addressed. Understanding the investigative and clean-up process and implementing biosecurity measures specific for each disease are key roles of poultry veterinarians are emphasized. Finally, veterinarians will be able to explain the OIE’s role in preventing disease spread via exports. 1.0 USDA APHIS, VS.
     4:10-5:00 p.m.Animal Health Emergency Response Suzett K. HexumThis module describes how practicing veterinarians can play a role in an animal health emergency response. The various “teams” (NAHERC, VMAT, NVRT, State response) are reviewed to demonstrate their similarities and differences. Understanding the structure of a response and how it is coordinated is key to its success, thus the various components related to NIMS, ICS, NRF and the ESF are reviewed. Finally, the components of FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines are described so veterinarians can comprehend what types of duties they will perform in an actual event. 1.0 USDA APHIS, VS.
    2:00-2:50 p.m.Sheep and Goats: Disease Awareness and Health CertificatesSuzett K. HexumThis module begins with an overview of the sheep and goat industries and a review of eight diseases that impact the industry. Veterinarians should be aware of these important conditions, especially when inspecting animals prior to interstate or international movement. The National Scrapie Eradication and the Scrapie Flock Certification programs are reviewed highlighting the genetic components and identification requirements. Finally, examples of properly completed health certificates for sheep and goats are provided to help veterinarians avoid common errors that can lead to delays or refusal of entry for their client’s animals.1.0USDA APHIS, VS.
    TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

    The preconference session is presented by the USDA.

    The mission of the National Veterinary Accreditation Program is to provide private veterinary practitioners with the information they need to ensure the health of the Nations’ livestock and animal population and to protect the public health and well-being.

    How do I renew my accreditation?

    1. You will receive a reminder of your renewal along with instructions.
      1. If you have a valid e-mail address on record-you will be sent e-mail reminders at six (6), three (3), and one (1) month intervals before your renewal.
      2. If you have an invalid or no e-mail address on record, we will send you a   reminder notice via USPS three (3) months before your renewal.
    2. You must complete your required APHIS-approved supplemental training (AAST) Six (6) AAST modules for Category II or three (3) AAST modules for Category I.
      1. AAST is available, free, on the NVAP Website www.aphis.usda.gov/nvap
      2. AAST is also available by ordering the CD or paper versions for the cost of production and mailing. Contact your local VS NVAP Coordinator.
      3. AAST is available as lectures at veterinary meetings and conventions
    3. Submit VS Form 1-36A
      1. Paper form; submit to your local VS NVAP Coordinator.
      2. On-line

    The APHIS Approved Supplemental Training modules presented at the University of Illinois Fall Conference may be used to satisfy your veterinary accreditation renewal. The modules are also accepted by the Illinois veterinary licensing board as CE for your veterinary license.

    The USDA sessions have been added to the program for your convenience. The University Of Illinois College Of Veterinary Medicine does not have information about the specifics of veterinary accreditation nor the modules presented. Please contact Dr. Susie Hexum for this information.

    If you have any questions, in regards to veterinary accreditation or USDA APHIS please contact Dr. Susie Hexum by email or phone.

    Suzett.hexum@aphis.usda.gov
    (217) 246-2950

    • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2016

      Track: Food Animal I
      Room: Technology

      10:00-10:50 a.m. 20 Years of PRRS Virus Management and Control – How did we get here? and Where are we going? Bill Hollis-’96The veterinarians at Carthage Veterinary Service have work with producers in all phases of swine production for over 30 years.  PRRS virus has been an ever changing battle as producer groups have grown, as vaccine and management strategies have changed, and as our understanding of this nasty virus has matured.  Sometimes we question if we are winning at all.  Good news is some management practices have become predictable and some control measures have brought welcome results.  In this session we will discuss lessons from early PRRS virus mistakes, successes with both vaccine strategy and air filtration management, and future steps to prepare for the next PRRS outbreak with aggressive action planning.1.0
      11:00-11:50 a.m. Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex:  Causes, Costs, and Control Strategies John Waddell-’81Despite tremendous advances in swine health technologies, respiratory disease complex remains the primary drag on growing pig performance and profit.  Individually, swine respiratory pathogens all impact production but whenever these pathogens act in concert, the results can be devastating.  This presentation will address what we have learned regarding the causes, costs and control strategies and provide veterinarians with tools to address this issue.1.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-2:05 p.m. Judicious Use of Antibiotics; It’s Easier than You Think Dick Wallace Livestock producers are facing increasing scrutiny from all corners about many aspects of how they manage their operations.  Antibiotics are a tool to maintain animal health, but any tool can be abused.  Consumers trust veterinarians.  Regulators believe that when veterinarians are involved in treatment decisions, violative residues are less likely.  Judicious use of antibiotics are a requirement to provide safe meat and milk.  This presentation will cover the highlights of the Veterinary Feed Directive and describe the WVMA Food Armor program, a HACCP approach to proper drug use on dairy farms.1.0
      2:15-3:05 p.m. Urolithiasis in Small RuminantsEdgar Garrett This session will provide a review of diagnostic approaches, medical management and surgical intervention for urolithiasis in small ruminants. Routine and complicated cases will be discussed.1.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-4:15 p.m. Updates on Breeding Soundness Exams in Male Ruminants Jamie Stewart-’13 A review of the most recent updates on semen evaluation and other novel approaches to evaluating breeding soundness in bulls, rams, and bucks.  Will include a brief review of recent literature as it pertains to clinical medicine.1.0
      4:25-5:15p.m. Why Didn’t I Think of That? Practice TipsRudy Corman-’91

      Ashley Mitek-’11

      Lynette Hemker-’06

      Bill Hollis-’96

       Developing a Dispensing Catalog Business (Corman)

      Top 5 Things to Promote Business (Hemker)

      Building Multigenerational Teams–A Simple Practice Tip (Hollis)

      1.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

       

      Track: Small Animal I
      Room: Alma Mater

      10:00-10:50 a.m.Non-Surgical Neutering Bob Weedon1.0
      11:00-11:50 a.m. ZeuterinBob Weedon1.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-2:05 p.m. Apoquel vs. Atopica vs. Steroids Jason Pieper Allergic dermatitis can be a very troubling and frustrating disease to treat.  With the new addition of Apoquel in the last few years, we will compare Apoquel vs. Atopica vs. Steroids in the treatment of allergic dermatitis.1.0
      2:15-3:05 p.m. Treatments for Otitis Externa Jason Pieper Otitis externa can be a relatively easy disease to treat at times, but the chronic, recurring cases can be extremetly frustrating at times.  With all the new products recently available, we will discuss different options for treatment of otitis externa.1.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-4:15 p.m. Dermatophytosis: The Chameleon of Infectious Diseases Jason Pieper Dermatophytosis can affect any species of animal and can be pretty frustrating at times.  It is the disease that can look like anything.  We will discuss some of the newest information available regarding dermatophytes in our animals.1.0
      4:25-5:15p.m. This or That? Dissecting Your Dermatology Differential Diagnosis! Jason Pieper There are many dermatologic diseases that may present with extremely similar clinical signs.  We will cut to the chase in order to make the proper diagnosis between similar appearing dermatologic diseases.1.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

       

      Track: Small Animal II
      Room: Lincoln

      10:00-10:50 a.m. Recognition of Common Arrhythmias—Causes and Treatment OptionsRyan Fries This presentation focuses on the interpretation of electrocardiography (ECGs) with special focus on the most common arrhythmias. Medical and surgical management of these conditions will be discussed.1.0
      11:00-11:50 a.m. Effusion Confusion—Prognosis and Treatment for Dogs and Cats with Pericardial EffusionRyan Fries This presentation covers the most common causes of pericardial effusion in dogs and cats, as well as a step by step approach for how to safely perform a pericardiocentesis in general practice.1.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-2:05 p.m.Being a Valuable AssociateDrew Sullivan-’111.0
      2:15-3:05 p.m. Behavior Case TriageKelly Ballantyne-’05This talk will focus on how the veterinary team can integrate behavioral care into their practices as well as how to identify, assess, and assist patients presenting with behavioral concerns.1.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-5:15 p.m. Why Didn’t I Think of That? Practice TipsPaul Myers—’86

      Ray Ramirez—’86

      Shawn Costello—’86

      John Calhoun—’96

      Morgan Wilson—’01

      John Spence—’01

      Charlie McCully—’11

      Drew Sullivan—’11

      Share the Care (Myer)

      The Things I’ve Learned That Have Helped Me Better Deal With People (Ramirez)

      Enhancing the Impact of Social Media (Calhoun)

      Yeast in the Beast (Wilson)

      Treatment of Yourself in Veterinary Medicine: An Rx by the Decade (Spence)

      2.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

       

      Track: Parasites: A Tribute to Dr. Allan Paul’s Legacy
      Room: Humanities Room

      10:00-10:50 a.m.The Drug Discovery Process in Search of a New ParasiticideDouglas Hutchens-’961.0
      11:00-11:50 a.m.Basis of Anthelmintic Resistance and Novel Approaches to Development of New Efficacious Anthelmintic DrugsWilliam WitolaThis talk provides an overview of factors contributing to development of anthelmintic resistance and describes novel strategies for developing alternative and effective anthelmintic drugs.1.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-3:05 p.m. Canine and Feline Heartworm Disease: Current Approaches to Diagnosis, Treatment and PreventionByron Blagburn-’822.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-5:15 p.m. A Review of the Safety of Macroccyclic Lactone Anthelmintics in MDR1(-/-) Dog BreedsDaniel Snyder-’87 In the late 1980’s,  Dr. Paul and colleagues in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois, in collaboration with scientists at Merck,  were the first to publish data on potential adverse events in collie dogs given high doses of macrocyclic lactones (ML).   Additional research has been conducted since these seminal studies were published, including more detail on the specific mode of action, the specific genetic mutation in dogs, new tests to identify dogs with the genetic mutation and potential treatment modalities given to dogs experiencing adverse events after adminstration of a ML.  This presentaton will give an overview of what we know about this clinical syndrome in sensitive dogs given ML’s and what new data has been generated since the late 1980’s.2.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

       

      Track: Small Animal III & Ophthalmology
      Room: Chancellor Ballroom

      10:00-11:50 a.m. Getting More Cats Into Your Clinic: How to Make Your Clinic More Cat FriendlyMarcus Brown-’862.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-2:05 p.m. Diagnosis and Management of Corneal Diseases—What’s New?Bianca MartinsThis lecture will discuss new diagnostic methods, management and treatments of corneal diseases, including ulcerative and non-ulcerative keratitis.1.0
      2:15-3:05 p.m. Uveitis: Managing the Fire WithinKathryn SmithThis lecture will discuss how to approach eyes presenting with intraocular inflammation, and review the most common causes of uveitis, diagnostic methods and treatment of the disease.1.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-4:15 p.m. What Do I Do Now? Discussion of Clinical Cases—DogsBianca Martins and Kathryn Smith This one hour interactive discussion will keep you on your toes.  Real clinical cases will be presented for group discussion and debate.  Let’s learn from each other!1.0
      4:25-5:15p.m. What Do I Do Now? Discussion of Clinical Cases—Cats Bianca Martins and Kathryn SmithThis one hour interactive discussion will keep you on your toes.  Real clinical cases will be presented for group discussion and debate.  Let’s learn from each other!1.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

       

      Track: Wellness in the Workplace
      Room: Quad Room

      10:00-11:50 a.m.Difficult Conversations:  From a Pounding Heart to an Open MindJeanne MalnatiConversations we dread, and often handle poorly, are part of all our lives: in boardrooms, and family rooms, across the negotiation table and the dinner table.  This workshop will teach us how to handle these discussions with more success and less anxiety.2.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-2:05 p.m. Finding that Work/ Life/Family Balance without Falling off the Seesaw too Many TimesSarah Probst Miller-’01 Achieving work, life and family balance can seem like an elusive goal. In this talk, Dr. Sarah talks about working to achieve self-awareness and self-regulation related to the work, life seesaw. She will work to give you the skills to know how to realize you may have fallen off the seesaw even though you think you may still be on it; how to know when to purposefully step off the seesaw for a while and figuring out which side to get off on; and how to get back on when you are ready.1.0
      2:15-3:05 p.m. Wellness in the WorkplaceSarah Allison-’01Implementing wellness in the workplace is a growing priority for large and small businesses alike. As veterinarians, wellness for ourselves, our staff, and colleagues is an issue of great importance. Learn how the AVMA Future Leaders Program has implemented wellness initiatives.1.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-5:15 p.m. Overcoming Negativity Bias to Discover The Best Version of YouGina Johnson Negativity bias is the human tendency to be 3-5 times more influenced and affected by negative events rather than positive or neutral events.  Negativity bias increases our stress levels, decreases our happiness levels and can leave us ineffective in the workplace.  Learn how to recognize thoughts and behaviors linked to this bias and ways to rewire your brain for goodthingz©.1.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

      Track: Equine I
      Room: Innovation

      10:00-10:50 a.m.Evaluation of Placenta in the FieldIgor Canisso1.0
      11:00-11:50 a.m.Recognizing Abnormal Foals Early in the FieldScott Austin, Pamela Wilkins, and Igor Canisso1.0
      11:50-1:15 p.m.Lunch
      1:15-3:05 p.m. Case Studies in Equine MedicineScott Austin, Pamela Wilkins, and Kate EcheverriaClinicians from the U of I Veterinary Teaching Hospital will utilize case presentations to facilitate the discussion of diagnostic challenges, utilization of new technologies in equine practice, and the application of innovative therapies to improve patient outcome.2.0
      3:05-3:25 p.m.Break
      3:25-5:15p.m. Case Studies in Equine Medicine (continuedScott Austin, Pamela Wilkins, and Kate EcheverriaClinicians from the U of I Veterinary Teaching Hospital will utilize case presentations to facilitate the discussion of diagnostic challenges, utilization of new technologies in equine practice, and the application of innovative therapies to improve patient outcome.2.0
      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor

       

    • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

      Track: Food Animal II
      Room: Technology

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-8:50 a.m.Update from the State VeterinarianMark Ernst-’84This lecture will provide a current overview of the Illinois animal health programs administered by the Department of Agriculture, as well as recent disease activity that will be of interest to those attending.  The focus will be on those programs and diseases generating current activity within and outside of Illinois.1.0
      9:00-9:50 a.m.Managing High Risk CattleDaniel Thomson1.0LeRoy G. Biehl Endowment
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-11:00 a.m.Receiving Cattle NutritionDaniel Thomson1.0LeRoy G. Biehl Endowment
      11:10 a.m.-NoonAntibiotics, Cattle Welfare, Food Safety, and Other Contemporary Issues of Beef Cattle ProductionDaniel Thomson1.0LeRoy G. Biehl Endowment
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-2:50 p.m.Illinois Swine Health NetworkJim Lowe-’94 and Erin Lowe-’082.0

       

      Track: Neurology
      Room: Alma Mater

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-8:50 a.m. How to Make the Neurological Exam Work for You: Exam Review, Focus and TipsJocelyn Cooper-’06This hour of lecture will review how to perform a neurological exam and then highlight important aspects to focus on for the busy private practitioner. We will also discuss tips for simplifying localization and forming a differential diagnosis.1.0
      9:00-9:50 a.m.The Paradox of the Vestibular PatientKari Foss-’08This lecture will focus on the approach to the vestibular patient including the pathophysiology of vertigo, differential diagnoses, along with diagnostic and treatment recommendations.1.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-11:00 a.m. MUE, GME, NME, NLE, SRMA – an alphabet soup of immune mediated CNS diseasesDevon HagueCome learn what these an acronyms mean and what we know (and don’t know) about this group of diseases.  We will discuss diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis for our canine patients.  We will also focus on the role of the general practitioner in management of these diseases.1.0
      11:10 a.m.-Noon Seizures: Who, What, and Why?Kari Foss-’08This hour of lecture will focus primarily on seizure disorders in dogs and cats with discussion on the pathophysiology and underlying etiologies that are most frequently encountered in our patients.1.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-1:50 p.m. What’s in Your Anticonvulsant Arsenal? How to Choose Therapy for Your PatientsJocelyn Cooper-06 This hour of lecture will build off of Dr. Foss’s lecture on seizures and will focus primarily on the decision-making process of initial drug selection, when to change dose or type of medication and monitoring. We will review specific cases in seizure management as examples to facilitate discussion.1.0
      2:00-2:50 p.m.Seizure Round TableDevon Hague, Kari Foss, & Jocelyn Cooper This interactive session will involve discussion of epilepsy cases with three neurologists and the audience.  We will work through what diagnostic tests to perform, when to start treatment, and what treatment options are available for each case example.  Audience participation and discussion will be encouraged.1.0

       

      Track: Surgery
      Room: Lincoln

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-8:50 a.m.How to Get the Most from GI Surgery: Biopsies to R&AJennifer ReaganThe goal of this lecture will be to provide practical tips and tricks for common gastrointestinal surgeries including enterotomies, intestinal resection and anastomosis, and simple gastric resection.1.0
      9:00-9:50 a.m.Wounds Part I: Navigating the plethora of options to get basic wounds to healElizabeth Maxwell & Laura SelmicWounds are seen on a day-to-day basis in small animal practice. There are many options for dressing types and wound management. This lecture will go through some of the options and indications for their use by providing case examples in an interactive format with i-clickers. This will provide attendees with a good foundation of knowledge in this area.1.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-11:00 a.m.Wounds Part II: Mission possible: getting complicated wounds to healElizabeth Maxwell & Laura SelmicThis lecture is a continuation from Wounds Part I, and explores options for management of complicated wounds. This lecture will discuss the options and indications for advanced wound management by providing case examples in an interactive format with i-clickers.1.0
      11:10 a.m.-NoonAbdominal Explore: Tips and TricksLaura SelmicAbdominal exploratory surgery is an essential diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in small animal practice. This lecture will discuss practical tips and tricks to successful thorough assessment and sampling of abnormalities.1.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-1:50 p.m.Limping Through a Lameness ExamTige Witsberger-’06This lecture will focus on all aspects of a general orthopedic exam.  Both forelimb and hindlimb lameness will be discussed as well as videos of tips and tricks to localize the source of lameness and pain.1.0
      2:00-2:50 p.m.The Ins and Outs of Medial Patellar LuxationTige Witsberger-’06This lecture will cover the history, physical exam findings, diagnosis, and treatment options for medial patellar luxation.  Multiple treatment modalities will be discussed and shown including tibial tuberosity transposition and trochlear recession techniques as well as the ‘patellar sling’ and trochlear replacement.1.0

       

      Track: One Health
      Room: Humanities

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-8:50 a.m.Tales From Public Health: From Caracal Bites to Monkey KissesConnie Austin-’871.0
      9:00-9:50 a.m.An Update on Medical CannabisDan Linn1.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-NoonInfectious DiseasesYvette Johnson-Walker-’892.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-2:50 p.m.Food Fads and FablesJohn Herrmann-’782.0

       

      Track: Small Animal V
      Room: Chancellor Ballroom

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-9:50 a.m.Cytology Cases for the ClinicianLaura Garrett-’91 and Anne Barger-’96This talk will give a brief summary of guidelines for acquisition and assessment of cytologic samples. Case presentations will be used to highlight key points.2.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-NoonOncology PearlsLaura Garrett-’91This talk will cover several common and critical procedures used and tumor types diagnosed in cancer patients.  Cytology, chemotherapy, communication, lymphoma, and osteosarcoma will be presented, using clinical case examples for highlighting key points.2.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-1:50 p.m.Coagulation Abnormalities in the Emergency PatientMaureen McMichaelLearn to recognize and treat the most common coagulation disturbances in the small animal patient.1.0
      2:00-2:50 p.m.Pediatric Emergency and Critical CareMaureen McMichaelLearn how to recognize and treat the most common emergency disturbances in the ER for neonatal and pediatric patients.1.0

       

      Track: Small Animal VI
      Room: Quad

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-8:50 a.m.Addison’s Disease—Anything New?Stanley RubinA case-oriented approach to diagnosis and management of Addison’s disease in the dog. Management using DOCP and fludrocortisone will be discussed.1.0
      9:00-9:50 a.m.Protein-Losing Enteropathy (PLE) in DogsStanley RubinThis talk will discuss pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and diagnostic work up of hypoproteinemia.

      Cases  of PLE in the dog will be used to illustrate principles of management.

      1.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-11:00 a.m.Cough in the DogStanley RubinA review of pathophysiology of cough. An update on symptomatic pharmacotherapy of cough.1.0
      11:10 a.m.-NoonInteresting Case Studies in Dentistry for the General PractitionerKatie KlingThis lecture will include cases received by the Dentistry Service that are relevant to the general practioner.  Cases will be presented in an interactive format and will include diagnostics, treatments, and outcomes, giving the practioner an opportunity to test their knowledge of veterinary dentistry annonomously with the use of iclickers.1.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-2:50 p.m.Interpretation of Small Animal Dental RadiographsAmy Somrak-’10This interactive lecture will present dental radiographs from cases commonly encountered in the small animal practice. We will discuss recognition and treatment of dental pathology including periodontal disease, endodontic disease, tooth resorption, neoplasia, and other conditions.2.0

       

      Track: Equine II
      Room: Innovation

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      8:00-8:50 a.m.Rehabilitation From Equine Musculoskeletal InjurySantiago Gutierrez-Nibeyro Rehabilitation is a critical step after surgical or medical therapy of orthopedic injuries.This aspect of veterinary medicine is growing within the veterinary community and horse industry.The lecture will provide an overview of the current physical treatments and rehabilitation methods available in this field.1.0
      9:00-9:50 a.m.Case Studies in Equine Lameness Annette McCoy1.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-11:00 a.m.Update on Wound Management in the HorseAnnette McCoy Management of wounds in the horse, particularly chronic distal limb wounds, can be a major challenge for practitioners. This lecture will review the available treatment options with particular emphasis on the evidence (or lack thereof) supporting their use. Illustrative cases will be presented.1.0
      11:10 a.m.-NoonUlcers, Melting, Abscesses—Navigating Corneal Diseases in HorsesBianca MartinsThis lecture will review how to approach, differentiate and manage corneal diseases in horses, including superficial and deep corneal ulcers, melting ulcer, corneal abscesses and immune-mediated keratitis.1.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-2:50 p.m.FarrierSteve Sermersheim1.0
       2:00-2:50 p.m.The State of the PRP Nation Matt Stewart

       

      Track: Small Animal VII
      Room: Excellence

      TimeLecture TitleSpeakerLecture DescriptionCESponsor
      9:00-9:50 a.m.Local and Regional Anesthesia in Small AnimalsStephanie Keating1.0
      9:50-10:10 a.m.Break
      10:10-11:00 a.m.Anemia Associated with Chronic Kidney DiseaseJulie Danner1.0
      11:10 a.m.-NoonThe MALDI-TOF Biotyper and Its Impact on Veterinary MicrobiologyCarol Maddox1.0
      Noon-1:00 p.m.Lunch
      1:00-2:50 p.m.What’s Your Next Move? An Interactive Toxicology Case Review from the ASPCA Animal Poison Control CenterMichael Biehl-’83 and Tina Wismer2.0

     

    VIEW PROGRAM

    • HANDS-ON OPPORTUNITIES

      Laboratories and workshops require an additional registration fee and are not subject to refunds. Should a program not meet minimum registration requirements by Monday, August 31, 2015, it may be cancelled. If the program is cancelled, registrants will be notified and all registration fees associated with the program will be refunded in full.

      Locoregional Anesthesia Workshop

      Date:             Friday, September 23, 2016
      Time:           1:00-2:30 p.m.
      Location:      Small Animal Clinic, Room 61
      Instructor:   Stephanie Keating
      Fee:               $175
      CE:                  1.5
      Limit:             16

       

    • CONFERENCE SOCIAL EVENTS

      Alumni Awards Luncheon
      Thursday, September 22, Noon
      iHotel and Conference Center

      University of Illinois CVM Alumni and Fall Conference attendees are invited to join us for the annual College of Veterinary Medicine Alumni Awards Luncheon. At this event, you can reconnect with your classmates and colleagues and celebrate the accomplishments of your fellow DVMs.

      The College, along with the Veterinary Medical Alumni Association, will present the 2016 Dr. Erwin Small Distinguished Alumni Award, the Special Service Award, and the new Outstanding Young Alumni Award. Recipient names will be announced at a later date.

      Thursday Evening Dinner
      Thursday, September 22, 2016
      iHotel and Conference Center

      Join your colleagues and classmates for dinner following the conference sessions. You will have an opportunity to reconnect and meet new people. This year’s dinner will feature entertainment by Dr. Stuart Clark-Price’s band, The Low Wines, as well as the Marching Illini Drumline. During the dinner, you will have an opportunity to support our scholarship fund by participating in a silent auction. And there will be plenty of time to socialize with your colleagues and classmates!

      Tickets to the dinner are included with full conference and Thursday-only registrations. Additional registration is not necessary for conference registrants, but an RSVP is required by Monday, September 5, 2016. Individual tickets may also be purchased for spouses and guests not taking advantage of the registration option. Individual tickets are $40 each.

      Alumni Celebration
      Friday, September 23, 3:30 p.m.
      Papa Del’s Pizza
      1201 S. Neil Street, Champaign, IL

      Join us at Papa Del’s Pizza for our Alumni Celebration! One ticket to the kick-off is included with full conference and Friday-only registrations. Additional registration is not necessary for conference registrants, but an RSVP is required by Monday, September 5, 2016. Individual tickets may also be purchased for spouses or guests not taking advantage of the registration option. Individual tickets are $10 each.

      If you graduated in a year ending in a 1 or a 6, please visit go.illinois.edu/vmreunions to learn more about your specific reunion plans.

      Golf Outing
      The Golf Outing has moved! It will be held later in the year. Details to come.

    • Keynote Speaker

      Jeanne MalnatiThursday, September 22
      9:00 a.m.
      Illinois Ballroom

      The Malnati Effect: How to Build an Award Winning Team and Business

       

      Jeanne will share personal and professional lessons learned in her business, The Culture Group, combined with her 35+ years of being an integral part of the successful Malnati family pizza business. She will reveal secret ingredients on how to build an award-winning workplace where people (employees and clients) love arriving every day and–it has nothing to do with what’s cooking in the ovens.

      Rather, using her “Clean and Clear Communication” Model, she will tell stories and teach powerful tools that, if applied, will immediately shift the health of your work dynamics. You will be inspired, challenged, and your heart will be moved to address long over-due issues, raising the bar of your relational intelligence in your veterinary practice.


      Sponsored by Zoetis logo

    • Speakers

      Sarah Allison ’01
      DVM
      Clinical Assistant Professor
      Division of Animal Resources
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Connie Austin ’87
      DVM
      Illinois Department of Public Health
      Springfield, Ill.

       

      Scott M. Austin ’90 MS
      DVM, MS
      Diplomate, ACVIM (Large Animal)
      Clinical Assistant Professor
      Equine Medicine and Surgery Section Head
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Kelly Ballantyne ’05
      DVM
      Clinical Instructor, Chicago Center for Veterinary Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Chicago, Ill.

       

      Anne Barger ’96
      DVM
      Diplomate, ACVP
      Clinical Associate Professor
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Michael Biehl ’83
      DVM, PhD, MBA
      Diplomate, ABT
      Clinical Professor
      Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Byron Blagburn ’82
      PhD
      Auburn University
      Dept. of Pathobiology
      Auburn, AL

       

      Marcus Brown ’86
      Nova Cat Clinic
      Arlington, VA

       

      John Calhoun ’96
      Chillicothe Veterinary Clinic
      Chillicothe, Ill.

       

      Igor Canisso
      DVM, PhD, MSc
      Diplomate, ACVT (Animal Reproduction)  and ECAR (Equine Reproduction)
      Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Jocelyn Cooper ’06
      Mission Veterinary Specialists
      Helotes, TX

       

      Rudy Corman ’91
      Roseville Veterinary Services
      Roseville, Ill.

       

      Shawn Costello ’86
      Hartland Veterinary Clinic
      Woodstock, Ill.

       

      Julie Danner
      Veterinary Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Kate Echeverria
      Veterinary Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Sean P. Collins
      DVM, MS
      Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Daniel Dorbant 
      DVM
      Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Mark J. Ernst ’84
      DVM
      State Veterinarian
      Bureau Chief
      Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare
      Illinois Dept. of Agriculture
      Springfield, Ill.

       

      Kari Foss ’08
      DVM
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Ryan Fries
      DVM
      Diplomate, ACVIM (Cardiology)
      Clinical Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Edgar Garrett
      DVM, MS
      Clinical Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Laura Garrett ’91
      DVM
      Diplomate, ACVIM (Oncology)
      Clinical Associate Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Santiago D. Gutierrez Nibeyro
      DVM, MS
      Diplomate, ACVS
      Clinical Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Devon Hague
      DVM
      Diplomate, ACVIM (Neurology)
      Clinical Assistant Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Lynette Hemker ’06
      DVM
      Greenville, Ill.

       

      John Herrmann ’78
      DVM, MPH
      Director, DVM/MPH Program
      Clinical Associate Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Suzett K. Hexum
      DVM
      Illinois Field Veterinary Medical Officer
      Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
      United States Department of Agriculture
      Springfield, Ill.

       

      Bill Hollis ’96
      DVM
      Carthage Veterinary Service
      Carthage, Ill.

       

      Doug Hutchens ’96
      DVM
      Chief Veterinary Officer
      Bayer AG

       

      Gina Johnson
      MSW
      Owner/Life Business Coach
      Blueprint
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Yvette Johnson-Walker ’89
      DVM, PhD, MS
      Clinical Instructor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Stephanie Keating
      DVM, DVSc
      Diplomate, ACVAA
      Clinical Assistant Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Katherine Kling
      DVM
      Instructor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Daniel Linn

       

      Erin J. Lowe ‘08
      DVM
      Technical Manager
      Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc
      St Joseph, MO

      James F. Lowe ’94, ’04 MS
      DVM, MS
      Diplomate, ABVP (Food Animal)
      Associate Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Carol Maddox
      PhD, MS
      Professor
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Jeanne Malnati
      Founder & CEO
      The Culture Group
      Chicago, Ill.

       

      Bianca Martins
      DVM
      Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Elizabeth Maxwell
      DVM
      Veterinary Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Annette McCoy
      DVM, PhD, MS
      Diplomate, ACVS
      Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Charlie McCully ’11
      Eastland Companion Animal Hospital
      Bloomington, Ill.

       

      Maureen McMichael
      DVM, Diplomate, ACVCC
      Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Ashley Mitek ’11
      Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Paul Myer ’86
      Hawthorne Animal Hospital
      Glen Carbon, Ill.

       

      Jason Pieper
      DVM, Diplomate, ACVD
      Clinical Instructor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Sarah Probst Miller ’01
      Agcreate Solutions, Inc.
      Monticello, Ill.

       

      Ray Ramirez ’86
      Lakeview Veterinary Clinic
      East Peoria, Ill.

       

      Jennifer Reagan
      Veterinary Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Stanley Rubin MS ‘84
      DVM, MS, BSc
      Diplomate, ACVIM (Internal Medicine)
      Clinical Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Laura Selmic
      BVM, MPH
      Diplomate, ACVS
      Founding Fellow of Surgical Oncology, ACVS
      Assistant Professor
      Dep. Of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Steve Sermersheim
      CJF, AWCF
      Middlefork Forge
      Collison, Ill.

       

      Daniel Snyder ’87
      DVM
      Elanco
      Indianapolis, IN

       

      Amy Somrak ’10
      DVM
      Visiting Clinical Instructor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      John Spence ’01
      Sesser Animal Hospital
      Sesser, Ill.

       

      Jamie Stewart ’13
      Veterinary Resident
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill

       

      Matt Stewart
      MVet, PhD, BVSc
      Fellow, Australian CVS (Equine)
      Associate Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Drew Sullivan ’11
      Director, Chicago Center for Veterinary Medicine
      Clinical Instructor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Chicago, Ill.

       

      Daniel Thomson
      DVM, PhD, MS
      Professor
      CVM, Kansas State University
      Manhattan, KS

       

      John Waddell ’81
      DVM
      Boehringer Ingelheim
      Sutton, NE

       

      Dick Wallace
      McFarland, WI

       

      Robert Weedon
      DVM, MPH
      Clinical Assistant Professor
      Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Pam Wilkins
      DVM, PhD, MS
      Professor, Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Medicine
      CVM, University of Illinois
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      Morgan Wilson ’01
      DVM, MD
      Assistant Professor of Dermatology
      SIU School of Medicine
      Springfield, Ill.

       

      Tina Wismer
      DVM, Diplomate, ABVT and ABT
      Medical Director
      ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center
      Urbana, Ill.

       

      William Witola
      BVetMed, PhD, MS
      Assistant Professor
      CVM, University of Illinois

       

      Tige Witsberger ’06
      Staff Surgeon
      Mission Veterinary Specialists
      San Antonio, TX

    • CONFERENCE DETAILS

      Location

      iHotel and Conference Center
      1900 South First Street
      Champaign, IL
      217-819-5000

      Hands-on opportunities and tours will be offered at the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Champaign County Humane Society. Shuttles will be available to transport conference registrants during these scheduled times. The shuttle to the College will depart from the main conference center entrance.

      iHotel Map

      Registration

      The early registration deadline is Monday, September 5, 2016. Registrations faxed or postmarked after this date will be charged the on-site registration fee. Printed copies of the proceedings will be available to those who order them on or before September 5, 2016.

      REGISTER TODAY

      The full conference registration for veterinarians includes the following:

      • Admission to all conference lectures
      • One digital copy of conference proceedings
      • Access to proceedings online for viewing and printing two weeks prior to the conference
      • Refreshment breaks
      • Continental breakfasts
      • Lunches
      • Ticket to class reunion kick-off
      • Ticket to Thursday evening dinner with alumni association awards

      Attendance and participation in hands-on opportunities requires an additional registration fee.

      One-Day Registration

      One-day conference registration for veterinarians is available. Registration includes the following:

      • Admission to all conference lectures
      • One digital copy of conference proceedings
      • Access to proceedings online for viewing and printing two weeks prior to the conference
      • Refreshment break
      • Continental breakfast
      • Lunch
      • Ticket to class reunion kick-off for Friday-only registrants
      • Ticket to Thursday evening dinner with alumni association awards for Thursday-only registrants

      Attendance and participation in hands-on opportunities requires an additional fee.

      Spouses and Guests

      Spouse and guest registration includes continental breakfasts, all refreshment breaks, and lunches (and the Thursday evening dinner for those with Thursday registration). Please include spouses and guests on the registrant’s form.

      Practice Passes

      A practice pass can be purchased for the two-day conference and used by one veterinarian per day. One digital copy of the proceedings will be given to the first person who attends to be shared between the registrants within that practice. Each person attending the conference should be indicated on the registration form.

      Conference Fees

      Payment must be provided at the time of registration to guarantee enrollment. Conference fees are payable by check or money order to the University of Illinois by Visa, Master Card, Discover, or American Express and are due at the time of registration. Early registration is recommended.

      Early RegistrationLate Registration
      Full Conference$355$405
      Thursday Only$290$340
      Friday Only$230$280
      Spouse & Guest Full Conference$120$140
      Spouse & Guest Thursday Only$90$110
      Spouse & Guest Friday Only$75$95
      Practice Pass$355$405
      Pre-Conference Session$50N/A

      Refund and Cancellation Policy

      Full refunds, less a $50 cancellation fee will be given if written notification is received by Monday, September 5, 2016. Registrations are transferable. After Monday, September 5, 2016, refunds will not be made. Refunds will not be made for hands-on opportunities. We reserve the right to cancel programs and to change speakers if necessary. In the event of a conference cancellation, all registrants will receive a full refund. The University is not responsible for travel expenses in the event of a cancellation or date change.

      Proceedings

      Conference registrants will have online access to proceedings by September 8, 2016. With their registration confirmation, registrants will receive a user name and password for accessing, viewing, and printing notes. Before arriving at the conference, registrants are encouraged to print the proceedings for the lectures they plan on attending.

      Every paid conference registrant will receive a digital copy of the proceedings (on CD or otherwise), which is included in the registration fee.

      Printed copies of the proceedings are available if pre-ordered on or before Monday, September 5, 2016 ($90). This preference should be indicated on the registration form. Recent printed conference proceedings contained approximately 700 pages of notes.

      Continuing Education

      Continuing education credit is available for veterinarians. Conference attendees are responsible for completing the Continuing Education Record of Participation form and having it signed by a conference representative prior to leaving the conference. Conference attendees are then responsible for submitting the record to their respective licensing agency and maintaining a record of participation. Continuing Education Record of Participation forms will be included with the materials to be picked up at conference registration. Designated areas for obtaining signatures will be provided at the conference. Continuing education certificates will not be generated as in past years.

      Registration and Information Desk

      Registration packets, including your name badge, meal tickets, and Continuing Education Record of Participation forms, may be picked up at the registration desk located in the lobby of the conference center. This desk will be staffed during the following times:

      Wednesday, September 21     11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
      Thursday, September 22             7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
      Friday, September 23                   7:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

      Transportation

      The University of Illinois is located near Interstates 57, 72, and 74. The community is also accessible by train via Amtrak and airplane through Willard Airport (CMI) at Savoy. Maps and directions to the College are available online at vetmed.illinois.edu/ope/.

      Registrants with Disabilities

      If you need an accommodation to attend this conference, please contact the Office of Public Engagement, 217-333-2907 or ope@vetmed.illinois.edu.

      Mark Your Calendar

      The 2017 Fall Conference dates are Thursday, October 26, and Friday, October 27.

      Parking

      Parking is available around the iHotel and Conference Center.  Additional parking is also available across the street at State Farm Center (formerly known as the Assembly Hall) parking lot.

      When visiting the College and not utilizing the conference shuttle, special conference parking will be available in the grassy area north of the Basic Sciences Building, just south of St. Mary’s Rd. Signs will be posted. Please do not park in any of the posted rental parking lots; you will receive a parking ticket and your automobile may be towed. The College of Veterinary Medicine is not responsible for costs incurred as a result of a parking ticket or an automobile tow.

      Special Accommodations

      If you need a special accommodation to attend this conference, please contact the Office of Public Engagement, 217-333-2907 or ope@vetmed.illinois.edu.

    • SPONSORS

      The 2015 Fall Conference is sponsored in part by:

      Zoetis logo

      Boehringer Ingelheim _logo

      colorrgb_idexx_laboratories

      Elanco high res blue 3d logo

      Storz

      • Class of 1962 Endowment Fund
      • Dr. LeRoy G. Biehl Endowment Fund
      • Sidney Krock Radiology Lectureship Fund
    • HOTEL INFORMATION

      Conference attendees are responsible for making their own hotel reservations. All hotel blocks will be held through August 22, 2016. Mention “Vet Med Fall Conference” to receive the group rate. The conference will be held at the iHotel and Conference Center. It is recommended that you book your reservations early. The prices listed below do not include taxes.

      Comfort Suites
      217-328-3500
      $99

      Country Inn and Suites
      217-355-6666
      $100

      Hawthorn Suites
      217-398-3400
      $95.99

      iHotel and Conference Center
      217-819-5000
      $129

      Holiday Inn Express
      217-328-0328
      $150

      Home2Suites by Hilton
      217-355-6468
      $119

    QUESTIONS?

    Please contact the Office of Public Engagement, 217-333-2907 or ope@vetmed.illinois.edu.