Pet News from UI Vet Teaching Hospital
 

CELEBRATE EARTH DAY, REDUCE YOUR PET'S CARBON PAW PRINT

You recycle and buy local. Now your furry friends can join the green movement, too. Learn more about how food and litter and other pet-related choices can help reduce your pet's carbon paw print.

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THIS SATURDAY, LET US WASH YOUR DOG FOR A GOOD CAUSE

Come to Vet Med on Saturday, April 23, and our Omega Tau Sigma students will wash and groom your dog with proceeds benefiting the Champaign County Humane Society.

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FREE EYE EXAMS FOR SERVICE ANIMALS

If you have a service animal in your life, learn more about how to participate in this May 2011 free eye exam program. Registration ends April 29.

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INTRODUCING OUR "PRIMARY CARE PRIMER" COLUMN

This issue introduces Primary Care Primer, a new Pet News column featuring tips for cat and dog owners from Dr. Kandi Norrell, the primary care veterinarian at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Primary care is the routine, year-round care that includes wellness care, disease prevention (vaccination), health maintenance, owner-education, and the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses. 

Warmer weather means more mosquitoes.   And more mosquitoes means a greater risk for heartworm.  Heartworm can be serious stuff.  It can lead to liver, lung, and heart disease, and is often fatal.  Though the lack of initial symptoms makes early detection difficult, heartworm disease is easy to prevent.  So put “schedule the dog’s annual heartworm exam and prevention” at the top of your warm weather to-do list.

Cats -- even indoor cats -- can get heartworm too. In fact, it's been found that 30% of cats diagnosed with heartworms are described by their owners as strictly indoor cats. In cats, heartworm disease is very difficult to diagnose because of the low number of worms. Once a cat is infected, there is no treatment. Many cats will die from the disease, although appearing perfectly normal even an hour before death.  The good news is that heartworm disease can be prevented with veterinary care and medication.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, contact the Primary Care Service at 217.333.5300.

SPRING HOLIDAY TIPS FROM OUR PET COLUMNS

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1008 W. Hazelwood Drive :: Urbana, IL 61802 :: 217.333.5300 (small animal) :: 217.333.2000 (large animal)