Welcome to the Office of Public Engagement, College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Veterinary Technician Conference

April 24-25, 2010

Saturday, April 24, 2010
Small Animal Medicine 100 Large Animal Clinic

  8:00-8:50 a.m. Basic Kitten Care: Getting Off On the Right Paw
Kandice S. Norrell
Guidelines and strategies that veterinary practices can integrate into their daily routines to help relieve anxiety before and during the veterinary visit, and recommendations specific to the kitten life stage with an emphasis on client education of behavioral and environmental issues that affect their cat's lifestyle. [1.0 CE]
  9:00-9:50 a.m. Senior Care Guidelines For Your Feline Patients
Kandice S. Norrell
Guidelines to help you promote longevity, recognize and control health risk factors, promote early detection of disease, maintain organ function and define aspects of screening, diagnosis and treatment of senior cats. [1.0 CE]
  9:50-10:10 a.m. Break
  10:10-11:00 a.m. Wow, It's an Eye Problem! How Can I Help My Clinician?
Ralph E. Hamor
This lecture will focus on the initial ophthalmic diagnostic tests that may be routinely performed by a technician, when to perform those tests and how to interpret the results. Attendees will learn how their assistance can help the patient and increase revenue at the same time. [1.0 CE]
  11:10 a.m.-Noon Reading Urine Sediments
Anne M. Barger
A brief review of preparation and examination of urine, including sediment examination, dipstick and specific gravity.  All aspects of urinalysis will be discussed but an emphasis will be placed on evaluation of urine sediment.  [1.0 CE]
  Noon-1:00 p.m. Lunch
  1:00-1:50 p.m. Canine Vaccinology and AAHA Protocols
Kandice S. Norrell
This lecture will review current vaccination recommendations as outlined by the 2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccination Task Force.  Included will be a review of core vs. non-core, one year vs. three year protocols, types of vaccinations (modified live, killed, recombinant), Vaccine preparation, handling and administration tips and documentation.  In addition, we will discuss the NEW H3N8 canine influenza virus and current recommendations for vaccination.  [1.0 CE]
  2:00-2:50 p.m. Feline Vaccinology and AAFP Protocols
Kandice S. Norrell
This lecture will review current vaccination recommendations as outlined by the American Association of Feline Practitioner’s Feline Vaccine Advisory Panel.  Included will be a review of core vs. non-core, one year vs. three year protocols, types of vaccinations (modified live, killed, recombinant), Vaccine preparation, handling and administration tips and documentation. [1.0 CE]
  2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
  3:10-4:00 p.m. Canine and Feline Heartworm Disease
Kandice S. Norrell
This lecture will review the American Heartworm Society’s latest information and guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of heartworm infection in both the cat and the dog. [1.0 CE]
  4:10-5:00 p.m. Feline Inappropriate Urination and Treatment Options
Kandice S. Norrell
Behavior problems are still the most common cause of euthanasia in pet cats.  This lecture will focus on client education of normal elimination behavior and methods of prevention and treatment of inappropriate urination.   [1.0 CE]

Saturday, April 24, 2010
Oncology
2251 Basic Sciences Building

  8:00-8:50 a.m. Get Ready, Set, Go: Approach to the Veterinary Cancer Patient
Jacqueline M. Wypij
Beginning with the clues to look for in the history and physical examination, we will cover cancer recognition and diagnostics in dogs and cats. Emphasis will be on the practical aspects of cytology and various biopsy techniques, as well as systemic staging including blood work and general imaging. [1.0 CE]
  9:00-9:50 a.m. Expressing Empathy: Bereavement Issues in Veterinary Practice
Jacqueline M. Wypij
In an open format, we will discuss techniques and ideas for supporting clients with terminally-ill pets. Audience participation and sharing of stories is encouraged. This lecture will include cultural issues, children, and staff concerns. [1.0 CE]
  9:50-10:10 a.m. Break
  10:10-11:00 a.m. Quality of Life: Palliative and Supportive Care
Jacqueline M. Wypij
Following a discussion of quality of life parameters and monitoring, we will focus on practical palliative and supportive techniques for the cancer patient. Topics will include analgesics, infections and antibiotics, skin complications/ulcer management, gastro-intestinal support including feeding devices and pharmaceuticals, and physical therapy. [1.0 CE]
  11:10 a.m.-Noon Chemotherapy Side Effects: What to Do When Things Go Wrong
Jacqueline M. Wypij
Although chemotherapy is generally well tolerated in pets, it is imperative to recognize and treat side effects immediately, before they become life-threatening. Following a brief discussion on the pathophysiology of how and why side effects occur, we will cover practical management of situations including gastrointestinal distress, myelosuppression and sepsis, acute tumor lysis syndrome, organ toxicity, hypersensitivity, and extravasation. [1.0 CE]
  Noon-1:00 p.m. Lunch
  1:00-1:50 p.m. Common Cat Cancers
Laura D. Garrett
Oncology talks tend to focus on our canine patients; this talk will highlight the tumors we see and treat most frequently in the feline patient.  Presenting signs, diagnostic testing, treatments, and prognosis for lymphoma, mast cell tumors, and assorted other tumors will be discussed.  [1.0 CE]
  2:00-2:50 p.m. Mast Cell Tumors
Laura D. Garrett
Canine mast cell tumors with their variable appearance, treatment options, and prognosis will be presented with many case examples. New treatment options, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, will be highlighted. [1.0 CE]
  2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
  3:10-4:00 p.m. A Review and What's New in Canine Lymphoma
Laura D. Garrett
In this presentation, canine lymphoma will be described in general, and the most common form of lymphoma will be discussed in detail. Diagnostic tests, treatment options, and prognosis will be covered. New clinical trials at the University of Illinois for the treatment of lymphoma will also be highlighted. [1.0 CE]
  4:10-5:00 p.m. A Review and What's New in Canine Osteosarcoma
Laura D. Garrett
In this presentation, cases will be used to demonstrate key features of this common canine cancer. Diagnostic tests, treatment options, and prognosis for this primary bone tumor will be covered. New clinical trials at the University of Illinois for the treatment of osteosarcoma will also be highlighted. [1.0 CE]

Saturday, April 24, 2010
Practice Management
2258 Basic Sciences Building

  8:00-9:50 a.m. Handy Tools for Communication in Hair-Raising Situations
Laura D. Garrett
Speaking with pet owners is something technicians and veterinarians do constantly, making it the most common “procedure” performed in veterinary medicine. Yet, very few veterinary professionals receive any guidance in this critical area during school or after. Being a good communicator is not just a personality trait; there are very specific and easy communication tools that can be used by everyone, even in stressful or emotional situations. Learn about concrete techniques applicable to all communication situations, including those difficult talks with co-workers or family members! [2.0 CE]
  9:50-10:10 a.m. Break
  10:10-11:00 a.m. Memorializing Companion Animals
Cheryl A. Weber
This session will present a wide variety of ways clients can memorialize their companions, review pet loss handouts available to clinics, and demonstrate verbal and non-verbal ways to express empathy. [1.0 CE]
  11:10 a.m.-Noon Getting the Client to Yes: Client Communication on Compliance
Kandice S. Norrell
Compliance refers to the percentage of clients that accept and follow through with treatment recommendations, and is fundamental to a successful outcome to treatment.   Only a small percentage of what is communicated verbally is actually remembered by the client when they return home.  This lecture will focus on strategies that work to improve compliance and convince clients of the importance of following through with home care instructions. [1.0 CE]
  Noon-1:00 p.m. Lunch
  1:00-2:50 p.m. Transport of Biological Materials
Linda M. Arseneau
Federal and international regulations mandate how biological materials are classified, packaged, and shipped. We will discuss how the University of Illinois is complying with the regulations and highlight some unique issues in the field of veterinary medicine. NOTE: This is not a certification session. [1.0 CE]
  2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
  3:10-4:00 p.m. Controlled Substance Regulations
Dianna M. Black
In this presentation we will discuss federal drug regulations including who the major players are and their respective roles.  We will discuss why knowing these regulations is important to the veterinary technician. [1.0 CE]
  4:10-5:00 p.m. Prescription Writing and Best Practices
Dianna M. Black
We will discuss prescription components and requirements including what can be phoned in to a pharmacy.  We will also discuss best practices in regards to ordering, storage and drug disposal. [1.0 CE]

Sunday, April 25, 2010
Rehabilitation and Anesthesia/Pain Management
100 Large Animal Clinic

  8:00-8:50 a.m. Introduction to Rehabilitation
Kim E. Knap
This lecture will present a brief description of many of the rehabilitation modalities and applications. [1.0 CE]
  9:00-9:50 a.m. Good Rehabilitation on a Budget
Kim E. Knap
Not all practices have the room and funding for al full rehabilitation facility. This lecture will present suggestions for providing a good rehabilitation program for patients. [1.0 CE]
  9:50-10:10 a.m. Break
  10:10-11:00 a.m. Rehabilitaiton of Cranial Cruciate Injury
Kim E. Knap
This session will go through the protocol at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for cruciate rehabilitation. [1.0 CE]
  11:10 a.m.-Noon Management of the Geriatric Pet
Kim E. Knap
This lecture will present a complete approach to helping older pets live in comfort and happiness. [1.0 CE]
  Noon-1:00 p.m. Lunch
  1:00-2:50 p.m. Pharmacology of Anesthetic and Pain Management Drugs
Stuart C. Clark-Price
This lecture will present the mechanism of action of common and newer analgesic agents. [2.0 CE]
  2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
  3:10-4:00 p.m. Practical Uses of Pain Management Drugs
Jessica R. Risley
This session will address the techniques of constant rate infusions and local anesthetics. [1.0 CE]
  4:10-5:00 p.m. Advanced Anesthetic Monitoring
Angela N. Otto
This session will present how to thoroughly monitor the anesthetized patient using CO2, pulse oximetry, invasive and non-invasive blood pressure, temperature, and ECG. The importance of checking reflexes will also be addressed. [1.0 CE]

Sunday, April 25, 2010
Diagnostic Imaging
2251 Basic Sciences Building

  8:00-9:50 a.m. Special Radiographic Procedures
Debra J.M. McCall
Contrast studies can be a valuable diagnostic tool. This talk will describe basic gastrointestinal, urinary, and other more common special procedures. [1.0 CE]
  9:00-9:50 a.m. Urinary Contrast Imaging
Jodi S. Matheson
Radiographic contrast studies of the urinary tract can be easily done by the private practitioner. This program will describe common urinary problems and radiographic interpretation. [1.0 CE]
  9:50-10:10 a.m. Break
  10:10-11:00 a.m. The Role of MRI in Veterinary Medicine
Susan K. Hartman
This lecture will review the basic physics and safety issues of MRI. It will also include case studies to demonstrate MRI studies in both large and small animals. [1.0 CE]
  11:10 a.m.-Noon Multislice CT: What Is It and How Can It Help My Patient?
Susan K. Hartman
The new 16-slice CT scanner is being used to perform scans without anesthesia or sedation. This makes it a faster and safer diagnostic tool. The use of the new “Mousetrap” is being used in emergency cases where the patient has compromised respiratory conditions. CT is now being used to replace other diagnostic tests such as nuclear scintigraphy for PSS studies.
  Noon-1:00 p.m. Lunch
  1:00-1:50 p.m. Basic Equine Positioning
Debra J.M. McCall
Jill E. Franzen
Diagnostic radiology is an important tool of the equine clinic.  Proper postioning is vital to get a good diagnostic image.  Participants will learn what good images look like, including good joint spaces, and how to get them. [1.0 CE]
  2:00-2:50 p.m. Basic Small Animal Positioning
Melinda K. Smith
Caroline M. Wagner
This session will review the basic fundamentals of small animal radiographic positioning of the thorax, abdomen and orthopedic sites.  Attendees will learn helpful hints in obtaining diagnostic radiographs. [1.0 CE]
  2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
  3:10-4:00 p.m. Advanced Radiographic Positioning of Small Animals
Melinda K. Smith
Caroline M. Wagner
Learn when advanced radiographic views may be needed and how to position them. This session will cover advanced views of the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and limbs. [1.0 CE]
  4:10-5:00 p.m. Special Equine Radiographic Views
Eric R. Carlson

Sunday, April 25, 2010
Dermatology and Dentistry
2258 Basic Sciences Building

  8:00-9:50 a.m. My Dog Keeps Itching, What Do I Do? Dealing with the Pruritic Dog
Catherine A. Metry
This talk provides an overview of the common causes of pruritus in dogs. It reviews the basic work up necessary for diagnosing the underlying cause of the pruritus, and a brief overview of treatment options. [1.0 CE]
  9:00-9:50 a.m. Dirty, Pesky Fleas and Ticks: The Basic, Client Education, and Treatment Options
Catherine A. Metry
Dirty pesky fleas and ticks, the basics, client education and treatment options reviews the flea and its life cycle, the clinical importance of treating and preventing flea and tick infestations, and an overview of the current products on the market. Diagnosis and treatment of flea allergy dermatitis is also discussed.  [1.0 CE]
  9:50-10:10 a.m. Break
  10:10-11:00 a.m. Treating and Managing Recurrent Pyodermas
Catherine A. Metry
This talk will briefly review the underlying causes of recurrent pyodermas, and current treatment options for short-term and long-term management. Emphasis will be placed on antibiotic selection and topical management for the chronic cases. Client education regarding resistant infections will also be addressed. [1.0 CE]
  11:10 a.m.-Noon Treating and Managing Fungal and Yeast Infections of Dogs and Cats
Karen L. Campbell
This talk will briefly review fungal and yeast skin infections of dogs and cats. Diagnostic procedures will be discussed in detail and options for treatment will also be presented. [1.0 CE]
  Noon-1:00 p.m. Lunch
  1:00-1:50 p.m. Complete Oral Exam and Prophylaxis, Including Dental Nerve Blocks
Misty A. Finn
This lecture will include all the steps needed to complete a thorough dental exam and prophy.  It will also include descriptions and uses for various types of dental instruments. [1.0 CE]
  2:00-2:50 p.m. Dental Radiology
Misty A. Finn
This lecture will focus on the different types of systems for acquiring dental radiographs.  It will also cover techniques, as well as indications for taking dental radiographs. [1.0 CE]
  2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
  3:10-4:00 p.m. Oral Pathology Recognition and Dental Radiology Interpretation
Mary Buelow
This lecture will focus on the recognition of basic oral pathology and the interpretation of the associated dental films. [1.0 CE]
  4:10-5:00 p.m. Review and Assessment of Pathology Recognition and Radiograph Interpretation
Mary Buelow
This interactive session will cover all of the previous dentistry lectures and assess the attendees knowledge of the material presented. [1.0 CE]

Wet Labs
Wet labs require an additional registration fee and are not subject to refunds. The fees listed are for both practicing technicians and students. Should a lab not meet minimum registration requirements by Sunday, March 16, 2008, it may be cancelled. If the lab is cancelled, registrants will be notified and all registration fees associated with the lab will be refunded in full.

Introduction to Canine Ultrasound Imaging
Date: Saturday, April 24
9:00 a.m. - Noon
Location: Veterinary Teaching Hospital Imaging Facilities
Instructor: Jodi S. Matheson
Debra J.M. McCall
Melinda K. Smith
Fee: $100
CE Hours: 3.0
Limit: 10

This laboratory will present an introduction to basic canine sonography, in which participants will learn basic anatomy and scanning techniques. Participants will learn how to handle a transducer and how to obtain a diagnostic study by manipulating the controls of the ultrasound machine. The first hour will be a lecture will participants then gaining hands-on experience.

Basic Small Animal Radiographic Positioning
Date: Saturday, April 24
1:00 - 2:50 p.m.
Location: Veterinary Teaching Hospital Imaging Facilities
Instructor: Jill E. Franzen
Debra J.M. McCall
Fee: $35
CE Hours: 2.0
Limit: 10

This laboratory will demonstrate basic radiographic positioning. Participants will learn tips on how to properly position for thorax, abdomen, and basic orthopedic studies. Foam wedges will be provided to the participants courtesy of Illini Mattress Factory, Champaign, Ill.

Advanced Small Animal
Radiographic Positioning
Date: Saturday, April 24
3:10 - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Veterinary Teaching Hospital Imaging Facilities
Instructor: Melinda K. Smith
Caroline M. Wagner
Fee: $40
CE Hours: 2.0
Limit: 6

This laboratory will present special advanced views not considered routine. In the hands-on portion, participants will learn how to position and critique these special views.

Blood Smear Analysis
Date: Saturday, April 24
3:10 - 5:00 p.m.
Location: 2743 Basic Sciences Building
Instructor: Anne M. Barger
Lisa A. Shipp
Amy N. Schnelle
Fee: $50
CE Hours: 2.0
Limit: 40

This laboratory will begin with a review of making and staining a blood smear. Following the lecture, participants will have the opportunity to examine slide sets for red and white blood cell morphology and perform platelet estimates.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Wicked Worms in the Horse
Date: Sunday, April 25
9:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Location: Clinical Skills Learning Center
Instructor: Dennis D. French
Kimberly A. Kensell
Fee: $60
CE Hours: 2.0
Limit: 20

Drugs alone are not the answer for internal parasite control of horses. Knowing which parasites are infesting your client’s horse is as important as selling them dewormer. This laboratory will offer a review of age-related important parasites, diagnostic techniques to determine resistance levels, and treatment philosophy.