Welcome to the Office of Public Engagement, College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

U of I logo College of Veterinary Medicine

Fall Conference for Veterinarians

Conference Lecture Schedule

Thursday, September 19, and Friday, September 20, 2013

Download a PDF of the printed registration form.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 | Pre-Conference Sessions
National Veterinary Accreditation Program Spartans Room

1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Animal Health Emergency Response
Suzett K. Hexum
This session describes how practicing veterinarians can play a role in an animal health emergency response. The various “teams” (NAHERC, VMAT, NVRT, state response) are reviewed to demonstrate their similarities and differences. Understanding the structure of a response and how it is coordinated is key to its success, thus the various components related to NIMS, ICS, NRF, and the ESF are reviewed. Finally, the components of FAD PReP/NAHEMS guidelines are described so veterinarians can comprehend what types of duties they will perform in an actual event. (1.0 CE)
2:00-2:50 p.m. Exotic Avian Diseases
Suzett K. Hexum
The first part of this module addresses two very important diseases in birds – avian influenza and exotic Newcastle disease – and their potential economic impact on the US economy. Clinical signs associated with these diseases and specific biosecurity measures to implement are included. In the second part of this module, veterinarians progress through an interactive scenario where one of these diseases is potentially introduced to the US through the pet bird industry. Veterinarians will learn the process of reporting a possible exotic avian disease and the chain of events that occur in a foreign animal disease. (1.0 CE)
2:50-3:10 p.m.
Break
3:10-
4:00 p.m.
International Movement of Horses
Suzett K. Hexum
This module illustrates the scope of international horse travel and the economic factors associated with its growth, including examples of disease outbreaks that have occurred throughout the world. Proper completion of health certificates for temporary or permanent movement is included. An interactive scenario that demonstrates the process for permanently exporting a horse internationally is presented. Emphasis is placed on the role of the accredited veterinarian, isolation procedures, the required laboratory tests, and accurately completing an international health certificate. (1.0 CE)
4:10-
5:00 p.m.
Animal Welfare:
An Introduction
Suzett K. Hexum
This module introduces veterinarians to important concepts and issues surrounding animal welfare. The module covers the role of the veterinarian in animal welfare, definitions of animal welfare, how welfare can be measured and evaluated, and an overview of some contemporary animal welfare topics. (1.0 CE)

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Business Management, Spartans Room

9:00-
9:50 a.m.
Future of Veterinary Medicine
Owen E. McCafferty
This session will address how the economy will affect the future of veterinary medicine and the future of veterinary medicine as the speaker sees it. (1.0 CE)
10:00-
10:50 a.m.
Determining Practice Worth
Owen E. McCafferty
This lecture will cover how cash or accrual accounting affects the practice worth of a veterinary practice. (1.0 CE)
11:00-
11:50 a.m.
Valuation: Part I
Owen E. McCafferty
This session provides a description of calculated value reports, what is trending and why it is useful, and a brief analysis of internal control. (1.0 CE)
11:50 a.m.-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Valuation: Part II
Owen E. McCafferty
This lecture will cover how a valuation on a pro forma (“what if”) basis will help decide the future of a veterinary practice. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Holding vs. Folding
Owen E. McCafferty
This session will address how to decide the future of your practice, how it will affect your doctors, staff, and patients, the various issues involved, and how to make it successful. (1.0 CE)
2:50-
3:10 p.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
3:10-4:00 p.m. Continuation vs. Succession
Owen E. McCafferty
Attendees of this session will learn how to decide the future of your practice, the advantages and disadvantages of continuing or succession.
4:10-
5:00 p.m.
Transitioning and Its Burden
Owen E. McCafferty
This session will present a discussion of how to transition after deciding the future of your veterinary practice, the different burdens faced with transitioning, and how to make transitioning successful.. (2.0)

Owen E. McCafferty's lectures are sponsored by the Class of 1962 Endowment Fund.

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Small Animal Cardiology and Small Animal Anesthesia, Fighting Illini Room

9:00-
9:50 a.m.
When the Pressure's On: Managing Hypertension in Dogs and Cats
Marcella D. Ridgway
Hypertension is increasingly recognized as a significant clinical problem in small animal medicine. This presentation will address health implications of hypertension in dogs and cats and present practical measures to identify and manage this important medical problem. (1.0 CE)
10:00-10:50 a.m. Tachy-Arrhythmias
Maureen McMichael
This session will present a concise overview of the most life threatening tachy-arrhythmias seen in emergency practice. Supraventricular tachycardia (including atrial fibrillation), as well as ventricular clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment will be covered. (1.0)
11:00-
11:50 a.m.
Brady-Arrhythmias
Maureen McMichael
This lecture will provide a concise overview of the most life-threatening brady-arrhythmias seen in emergency practice. First-, second-, and third-degree AV block, AV junctional, and escape rhythms, and hyperkalemia including the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment will be covered. (1.0 CE)
11:50 a.m.-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Anesthetic Considerations for the Patient with Cardiovascular Disease
Berit L. Fischer
Knowing that anesthesia can affect the cardiovascular system significantly in healthy patients, there is greater concern when pre-existing cardiovascular disease is present. This lecture will help the practitioner develop an anesthetic plan by working through the pathophysiology of commonly encountered cardiovascular diseases. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
A Practical Approach to Anesthetic Protocol Building for the Small Animal Practitioner
Stuart C. Clark-Price
Many anesthetic and analgesic drugs are available to the small animal practitioner. It is well known that a ‘one size fits all’ for anesthetic protocols is less than ideal. This lecture will cover a practical approach for selecting anesthetic and analgesic drugs for patients with various systemic illnesses..(1.0 CE)
2:50-
3:10 p.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
3:10-
4:00 p.m.
Managing Common and Uncommon Complications of Anesthetized Small Animal Patients
Stuart C. Clark-Price
There is no such thing as completely safe anesthesia. Anesthesia complications can occur that can compromise a patient’s health and even result in death. Many anesthetic complications and accidents can be minimized or avoided with proper knowledge and avoidance techniques and vigilant patient preparation and monitoring. Early identification of complications is essential so that actions can be taken to minimize their impacts. (1.0 CE)
4:10-
5:00 p.m.
What's Coming Down the Pipeline? A Discussion of Newer and Future Anesthetic and Analgesic Drugs for the Small Animal Practitioner
Stuart C. Clark-Price
The development and availability of anesthetic and analgesic drugs is a rapidly changing landscape. This lecture will discuss some of the newer uses of currently available drugs as well as the potential uses of future drugs. (1.0 CE)

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Small Animal Neurology, Little Chief Room

9:00-
9:50 a.m.
Getting the Most Out of Your Neurologic Exam: Part I
Devon W. Hague
Does the thought of performing a neurologic examination induce a state of fear? Are you a neuro whiz and want to learn a few new tricks to improve your examination skills? In this session we will review the basics of the neurologic examination and some pearls to make your exam more efficient and less traumatic for you and your patient. We will also discuss how abnormalities on your patient’s examination can be interpreted. (1.0 CE)
10:00-
10:50 a.m.
Getting the Most Out of Your Neurologic Exam: Part II
Devon W. Hague
Let’s put the puzzle pieces together to create the clinical picture! We will discuss how to use the examination results reviewed in the previous session to localize the lesion. This interactive session will involve watching videos of clinical cases and a stepwise approach to localization. (1.0 CE)
11:00-11:50 a.m. Small and Toy Breed Canine Neurologic Disease
Devon W. Hague
What differentials should you consider when evaluating small and toy breed dogs with neurologic symptoms? The congenital anomalies (i.e. COMS, AA lux) and various types of inflammatory disease conditions commonly seen in these little patients will be discussed. (1.0 CE)
11:50 a.m.-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Seizures: Part I
Devon W. Hague
Primary (idiopathic) epilepsy affects 1-2% of the canine population. But most of the time, we as veterinarians do not see the seizures and need to rely on the clients for description. How do you get the most of your history? When should seizures be treated and when is it okay to wait? What should we tell clients about seizures? (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Seizures: Part II
Devon W. Hague
In the previous session we discussed why and why to treat. How about what to use to treat? We will review the options for both maintenance and emergency seizure treatment. We will also discuss options for using the newer anticonvulsants as monotherapy or add on medications with your patients. (1.0 CE)
2:50-
3:10 p.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
3:10-
5:00 p.m.
Spinal Cord Disease
Devon W. Hague
In this session we will discuss IVDD and other spinal cord differentials. Intervertebral disc disease is one of the most common spinal cord diseases in dogs. What are the current recommendations about treatment and management of IVDD? We will specifically focus on conservative medical management strategies that you can use with your patients. What if it is not IVDD? What are other differentials? FCE, ANNPE, DM, CCSM, SRMA, and other spinal cord disease acronyms will be described. (2.0 CE)

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Small Animal Internal Medicine, Boilermakers/Wildcats/Nittany Lions Room

9:00-
10:50 a.m.
Dermatological Manifestations of Internal Medicine Disease
Karen L. Campbell
The recognition of cutaneous manifestations of internal disease is helpful in diagnosing illnesses in animals. The skin is easily sampled by cytology, culture, and biopsy techniques facilitating the diagnosis of a variety of infectious immune-mediated, endocrine, metabolic, and neoplastic diseases. (2.0 CE)
11:00-
11:50 a.m.
New Tests of Coagulation
Kevin LeBoedec
This lecture presents the new tests that can be used to explore coagulation disorders in an animal, including those that can be offered at the College. The basic principles of the tests, the differences among these tests, indications of each, and several exercises to practice will be presented in an interactive session. (1.0 CE)
11:50 a.m.-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Blood Transfusion Medicine
Maureen McMichael
This lecture will address indications for blood transfusion, complications and reactions of transfusion, and methods to insure a safer blood transfusion. (1.0 CE)
2:00-2:50 p.m. What About Lepto?
Marcella D. Ridgway
Leptospirosis presents some real challenges in diagnosis and in making appropriate recommendations for environmental control and post-exposure management of contact animals in households with an affected pet. This presentation addresses questions that arise about prevention, diagnosis, and management of this challenging infection. (1.0 CE)
2:50-
3:10 p.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
3:10-
5:00 p.m.
Mellow Yellow...How to Handle an Icteric Cat and Dog
Stanley I. Rubin
This will be a case-based lecture discussing icterus in the cat and dog. The discussion will address clinical relevance, diagnostic tests, differentials, and treatment options in small animal patients. (2.0 CE)

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Feline Internal Medicine, Alumni Ballroom

9:00-
9:50 a.m.
Difficult Feline Internal Medicine Case: 12-Year-Old With Polyphagia
Thomas K. Graves
This case-based lecture will present the clinical signs, diagnostic tests, diagnoses, and treatment of this difficult feline internal medicine case.. (1.0 CE)
10:00-
10:50 a.m.
Difficult Feline Internal Medicine Case: 12-Year-Old With PU/PD
Thomas K. Graves
This case-based lecture will present the clinical signs, diagnostic tests, diagnoses, and treatment of this difficult feline internal medicine case.. (1.0 CE)
11:00-
11:50 a.m.
Difficult Feline Internal Medicine Case: 13-Year-Old With Weakness
Thomas K. Graves
This case-based lecture will present the clinical signs, diagnostic tests, diagnoses, and treatment of this difficult feline internal medicine case. (1.0 CE)
11:50 a.m.-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Feline Vaccination Part I: Protocols, Products, and Problems
Alice M. Wolf
This session will present what you need to know about vaccine adverse events, duration of immunity, and recommendations for a medically sound vaccination program for your practice. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Feline Vaccination Part II: Protocols, Products, and Problems
Alice M. Wolf
Learn what you need to know about vaccine adverse events, duration of immunity, and recommendations for a medically sound vaccination program for your practice. (1.0 CE)
2:50-
3:10 p.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
3:10-
4:00 p.m.
Managing the Diabetic Cat
Alice M. Wolf
This session will address unique techniques for a unique species, while coping with changing insulin availability. (1.0 CE)
4:10-5:00 p.m. The Vomiting Cat
Alice M. Wolf
This lecture will offer a discussion of diagnostic assessment, differential diagnosis, and management. (1.0)

Dr. Alice M. Wolf's Lectures are sponsorsed by Merial.

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Equine Medicine, Illinois Room (Homewood Suites)

9:00-
9:50 a.m.
Field Surgical Procedures and Techniques for Horses
Santiago D. Gutierrez-Nibeyro
This lecture will cover some of the simple surgical procedures and therapeutic procedures (i.e. regional limb perfusion) that can be done in the field. It will also include postoperative care, potential complications, and recent developments in field surgery. (1.0 CE)
10:00-
10:50 a.m.
Back Pain in Horses: New Approaches to Diagnosis and Treatement
Matthew C. Stewart
This session will provide an overview of new approaches to the diagnosis and therapeutic management to the back pain in horses. (1.0 CE)
11:00-
11:50 a.m.
How to Read Digital Radiographs of the Equine Foot
Santiago D. Gutierrez-Nibeyro
The lecture will review some of the lessons learned from the diagnosis of equine foot injuries using digital radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. (1.0 CE)
11:50 a.m.-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Breaking Equine News 2013
Pamela A. Wilkins
This session will cover important new information that has appeared in the literature since the fall of 2012 related to treating the horse. Practical information will be presented in addition to discussion of potential future directions. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Thoracic Trauma in Horses: Recognition and Treatments
Pamela A. Wilkins
This session will cover causes, recognition, and treatment of thoracic trauma in horses. Practical techniques will be emphasized including thoracic ultrasonography and placement of chest tubes in both adult horses and foals. Surgical techniques will be discussed as will determinants of when to refer. (1.0 CE)
2:50-
3:10 p.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
3:10-
4:00 p.m.
Strategies for Equine Parasite Control: The Challenge of Parasite ResistanceKara M. Lascola This lecture will cover the latest recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of equine parasitism. (2.0 CE)
4:10-5:00 p.m. Disaster Medicine
Scott M. Austin
When large scale disasters strike an area, veterinary practices are faced with emergency situations that have not previously experienced. Preparedness is the key.  Learn about training, resources (local, state, and federal), and basic rescue training. (1.0 CE)

Friday, September 20, 2013
Diagnostics and Practice Management, Spartans Room

8:00-
8:50 a.m.
A Practitioner's Practical Approach to Quality Control
A Russell Moore
This session will provide an overview of the basic principles of quality control and how to apply them in a practice setting. Topics will include recently published recommendations for quality assurance and laboratory error. (1.0 CE)
9:00-9:50 a.m. Cytology of Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Lesions
Amy L. MacNeill
This lecture will offer a review of how to collect samples for cytology and illustrates the cytologic appearance of common skin and subcutaneous masses. (1.0 CE)
9:50-
10:10 a.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
10:10 a.m.-Noon I Have Patience for My Patients, But My Clients are Driving Me Crazy
Laura D. Garrett
Core communication skills that can be applied in a multitude of situations will be presented and demonstrated in this session. These skills can be used with difficult clients and can also help prevent clients from becoming difficult. Interaction with audience members throughout the presentation will highlight real life examples and possible solutions for communication conundrums. (2.0 CE)
Noon-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Getting Clients to YES: Shared Decision Making
Laura D. Garrett
In this session specific communication skills that can be used to guide clients in decision making will be highlighted. Situations such as indecisive and reluctant clients will be discussed. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Getting Clients to Actually Give the Pills: Enhancing Adherence
Laura D. Garrett
Frustrated by clients that do not follow your diagnostic or treatment recommendations? Learn several communication tools that can be used to improve clients’ adherence and thus your patients’ outcomes, as well as the bottom line for clinic finances. (1.0 CE)

Friday, September 20, 2013
Small Animal Surgery, Fighting Illini Room

8:00-
9:50 a.m.
Traumatic Coxofemoral Luxation in Dogs: Surgical and Non-Surgical Management
Tisha A. M. Harper
Traumatic coxofemoral luxation is commonly seen in general practice. Appropriate and timely management is critical for salvage of the coxofemoral joint and return to function. We will cover both closed reduction, methods to augment closed reduction, and open reduction methods. (2.0 CE)
9:50-
10:10 a.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
10:10-
11:00 a.m.
Perioperative Management of the Small Animal Fracture Patient and Decision Making for Fractures
Tisha A. M. Harper
Appropriate management of the small animal fracture patient on initial presentation can significantly influence the success of subsequent fracture repair and healing. This talk will review initial management of open fractures. The session will also cover the fracture assessment scoring system and how it can be used to select the appropriate method for fracture repair/stabilization. (2.0 CE)
Noon-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
All Wounds Great and Small: First Aid and Advanced Treatment
Heidi Phillips
This lecture will focus on proper first aid as well as advanced treatment options for all types of wounds of varying severity, and will include instruction on aseptic technique, sharp and blunt debridement, bandaging techniques for open wounds, and minor and major reconstructive options for “not so small” wounds. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Innovations in Topical Wound Dressings and Bandages
Heidi Phillips
This lecture will further explore treatment options for wounds by highlighting newer wound therapies, including topical dressings such as calcium alginate and hydrocolloid gels, as well as bandaging innovations, including negative pressure wound therapy, or vacuum assisted closure (VAC). (1.0 CE)

Friday, September 20, 2013
Small Animal Internal Medicine, Little Chief Room

8:00-
8:50 a.m.
The Leaking Gut I: Protein-Losing Enteropathy
Marcella D. Ridgway
The gastrointestinal mucosa is an important barrier which prevents abnormal passage of material from the GI lumen into the body and abnormal loss from the body to the intestinal lumen. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a syndrome in which plasma proteins are leaked through the GI mucosa into the lumen leading potentially to hypoalbuminemia and the consequences thereof., This session will cover the pathophysiology of PLE, its associated primary diseases, and clinical approach to diagnostic evaluation and therapeutive management of PLE in dogs and cats.(1.0 CE)
9:00-9:50 a.m. The Leaking Gut II: Intestinal Lymphangiectasia and Breed-Related Enteropathies
Marcella D. Ridgway
Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is not a specific diagnosis but a syndrome associated with various non-GI and GI causes. In small animals, PLE is usually related to primary GI disease and dogs are more commonly affected than cats. In this session, specific GI causes of PLE in dogs will be addressed. (1.0 CE)
9:50-
10:10 a.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
10:10 a.m.-
Noon
Fungal Disease in the Small Animal Patient
Stanley I. Rubin
Fungal disease is common in the state of Illinois, and an infectious disease that many small animal practitioners must diagnose and treat. This lecture will discuss the common fungal diseases seen in Illinois and surrounding areas. The lecture will be strongly case-based for applicability. (2.0 CE)
Noon-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Treatment of Fungal Disease
Stanley I. Rubin
Samantha Middleton
This lecture will focus on treatment options for fungal disease in small animal patients with a strong emphasis on clinical applicability. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Nothing to Sneeze At: Addressing Nasal Diseaes in the Dog and Cat
Marcella D. Ridgway
Nasal disease occurs commonly and can be frustrating to diagnose and treat. Here we present an overview of the problem and describe practical techniques for addressing these cases in the practice setting. (1.0 CE)

Friday, September 20, 2013
Exotic Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Boilermakers/Wildcats/Nittany Lions Room

8:00-
8:50 a.m.
The Skinny on Exotic Mammal Derm Diseases
Kenneth R. Welle
A variety of dermatological conditions affect exotic mammal patients including dermatophytosis, ectoparasitism, and dermatitis. Learn how to find the underlying etiology and etiology and implement effective treatment for these common cases. (1.0 CE)
9:00-9:50 a.m. Blowing Open the Mystery of Exotic Mammal Airway Diseases
Julia K. Whittington
Small mammals often present for veterinary care with clinical signs that may be associated with respiratory disease. However, other non-respiratory etiologies need to be ruled out before an accurate diagnosis is made. We’ll air out the dos and don’ts for these challenging patients. (1.0 CE)
9:50-
10:10 a.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
10:10-
11:00 a.m.
What's New in Ferret Medicine
Kennel R. Welle
As one of the most popular exotic mammal pets, ferrets represent a clinical challenge for the veterinary practitioner due to their propensity to develop a variety of clinical conditions. Get the most up to date information about what’s new in ferret medicine, including therapies, diseases, and diagnostic testing. (1.0 CE)
11:10 a.m.-
Noon
Exotic Mammal Medicine: A Case-Based Review
Kenneth R. Welle
Julia K. Whittington
Spend an interactive hour discussing some challenging cases to build your diagnostic and clinical knowledge regarding small mammal patients. We’ll bring you into our virtual exam room to give you tips and tricks you can use in your office. (1.0 CE)
Noon-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Imaging of Upper Airway Disorders
Jodi S. Matheson
This session will provide a discussion of upper airway disorders, including when and how to image patients with upper airway disease.(1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Radiographic Interpretations of Lung Disease
Jodi S. Matheson
This lecture will provide a review of diagnosing lung patterns on radiographic images. (1.0 CE)

Dr. Jodi S. Matheson's lectures are sponsored by the Sidney Krock Radiology Lectureship Fund.

Friday, September 20, 2013
Ophthalmology and Small Animal Internal Medicine, Alumni Ballroom

8:00-
8:50 a.m.
Uveitis: What Is It and What Can I Do About It?
Ralph E. Hamor
This session will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of uveitis. (1.0 CE)
9:00-9:50 a.m. Glaucoma: Is It Really Worth the Effort
Ralph E. Hamor
This lecture will cover the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma. (1.0 CE)
9:50-
10:10 a.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
10:10-11:00 a.m. Ouch! My Pet's Eye Hurts
Ocular Emergencies
Sean P. Collins
This session will address the diagnosis and treatment of ocular emergencies. (1.0 CE)
11:10 a.m.-Noon Eye Challenge You! Clinical Cases in Veterinary Ophthalmology
Ralph E. Hamor
This one-hour interactive discussion will keep you on your toes. Real clinical cases will be presented for group discussion and debate. (1.0 CE)
Noon-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
American Heartworm Society Canine Guidelines for the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management of Heartworm Infection in Dogs
Kandice S. Norrell
These recommendations are based on the latest information presented at the 2010 Triennial Symposium of the American Heartworm Society, new research, and additional clinical experience. The lecture is designed to lead the veterinary profession in the understanding of heartworm disease and to encourage and help promote effective procedures for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of heartworm disease. Highlights include current testing recommendations, prevention, and the three dose regimen for treatment of heartworm positive dogs. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
AAHA Canine Vaccine Guidelines
Kandice S. Norrell
Since the last time the American Animal Hospital Association’s canine vaccination guidelines were revised in 2006, new vaccines have been licensed, others have been withdrawn, and new information has led to the revision of previous recommendations. The 2011 guidelines offer a comprehensive review of canine vaccines currently available in North America. (1.0 CE)

Friday, September 20, 2013
Food Animal Medicine, Illinois Room (Homewood Suites)

8:00-
8:50 a.m.
Update from the State Veterinarian
Mark J. Ernst
This lecture will provide a current overview of the Illinois animal health programs administered by the Department of Agriculture, as well as recent disease activity that will be of interest to those attending. The focus will be on those programs and diseases generating current activity within and outside Illinois. (1.0 CE)
9:00-9:50 a.m. People, Processes, and Pigs: Are We Fixing What Is Really Broken
James F. Lowe
Improving outcomes in production medicine is dependent on many factors.  To improve our success, we need a better understanding of non-disease factors and a systematic approach to the complex health issues we often face.  This lecture will propose a systematic method to improve outcomes in complex health challenges. (1.0 CE)
9:50-
10:10 a.m.
Break in Illini Ballroom
10:10-11:00 a.m. Control of Respiratory Disease: Putting Evidence-Based Medicine Into PracticeJames F. Lowe Management of respiratory disease in cattle and swine can be frustrating due to its multifactorial nature and significant economic costs to the producer.  This lecture will explore how to develop evidence based approaches to the management of respiratory disease and provide examples of how evidence based approaches are used in clinical practice.  (1.0 CE)
11:10 a.m.-Noon What Constitutes Anti-Viral Protective Immunity and How Do We Get it?
Federico A. Zuckermann
This talk will use examples of viral diseases of swine to explain major vaccinology concepts that are applicable to veterinarians at large. (1.0 CE)
Noon-
1:00 p.m.
Lunch in Illini Ballroom
1:00-
1:50 p.m.
Inquiry-Based Therapeutics in Food Animals
Brian M. Aldridge
Therapeutic decision making is one of the most difficult competencies to master in clinical practice.  It is very easy to adopt a mechanical approach in which one's choice of therapy is based on a personal or formulaic preference rather than on an analysis of active clinical data. In this presentation attendees will be challenged to examine their own medical decision making practices and will be introduced to an inquiry-based approach which uses patient data (physical exam and lab-based) in designing therapeutic strategies. (1.0 CE)
2:00-
2:50 p.m.
Challenging Neurologic Cases of Ruminants
Dennis D. French
This session will offer a team-based learning exercise with audience participation to define the problem list, diagnostic tests available, eventual diagnostic outcomes and treatment outcomes.  Participants will be provided materials that will assist in the process as to how these cases should be handled. (1.0 CE)

Dr. James F. Lowe's lectures are sponsored by the LeRoy G. Biehl Endowment Fund.