News

medical college faculty

Five Veterinary Faculty Among Medical College Inaugural 100

May 8, 2017 / Comparative Biosciences News

Five faculty members in the College of Veterinary Medicine are among the 100 prominent researchers, administrators, and medical professionals named to the faculty of the new Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the world’s first engineering-based college of medicine. The medical college is a partnership between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carle Health System,...

[petri dish used to grow fungus]

First-Year Vet Student Racks up First Scholarly Publication

Apr 12, 2017 / General News

What Kills the Fungus that Kills the Snakes? Having a journal article published during veterinary school is definitely a notable accomplishment—especially if it has already been cited several times since its publication in February 2016. Marta Rzadkowska, a first-year veterinary student at Illinois, is one of the co-authors of a publication titled, “Evaluation of Common...

[snake with fungal disease]

Illinois Team Tackles Mysterious Disease Afflicting Wild and Captive Snakes

Apr 12, 2017 / General News

Biologists and veterinarians across the central and eastern United States are calling on researchers at the University of Illinois to help them identify, understand and potentially treat snake fungal disease, a baffling affliction affecting more than a dozen species of wild and captive snakes in at least 15 states. The Illinois team, led by veterinary...

[vector-borne disease Culex larvae]

Illinois Part of New Center Focused on Vector-Borne Disease

Feb 19, 2017 / Center for One Health Illinois

Illinois research to address regional health concerns The University of Illinois is among a consortium of Midwestern universities in a new federally funded center created to fight diseases spread by insect vectors, especially mosquitoes and ticks, through a unified approach of research, training, and practice. The Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases,...

turtle

Illinois Zoo Pathology Graduate Looks into Mysterious Turtle Fungus

Dec 13, 2016 / General News

An emerging threat to freshwater turtles has become the focus of study for Dr. Daniel Woodburn. Dr. Woodburn was recently awarded a Morris Animal Foundation research fellowship to continue studies begun during his master’s project in the Zoological Pathology Program at Illinois. The first case of this previously unknown fungus, which appears on the shells...

[erdman, bolton, wallig]

Paper: Enzyme That Digests Vitamin A Also May Regulate Testosterone Levels

Dec 7, 2016 / Pathobiology

John Erdman Jr., Eric Bolton, and Matthew Wallig An enzyme that converts the dietary carotenoid beta carotene into vitamin A in the body may also regulate testosterone levels and growth of the prostate, a new study found. Scientists at the University of Illinois explored the impact of the enzyme Bco1 on testosterone levels and testosterone-sensitive...

[William Witola - C. parvum]

New Approach to Tackling Parasitic Disease Attracts Funding

Nov 29, 2016 / General News

As a young veterinarian in Zambia, Dr. William Witola wanted to know why the baby cows he saw were dying from a parasite resisting all treatment. Decades later, the University of Illinois Veterinary Medicine researcher is designing small molecules to silence that same parasite’s gene expression, find potential drug targets and help end a disease...

Dr. Susan Schantz NIH grant

Illinois, UCSF Receive $2.9 Million Grant to Study Child Health

Sep 22, 2016 / Comparative Biosciences News

The National Institutes of Health announced $2.9 million in new funding to the University of Illinois and the University of California, San Francisco, for studies to determine how maternal exposure to stress and to hormone-disrupting chemicals during pregnancy affect birth outcomes and child brain development. The funding is for the first two years of what...

[tamoxifen study leaders]

Scientists Identify Genes That Disrupt Response to Breast Cancer Treatment

Sep 7, 2016 / Pathobiology

Scientists may have unlocked the genetic code that determines why many patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer fail to respond to the widely used drug tamoxifen. Patients who have higher levels of several nuclear transport genes – particularly the protein XPO1 – are more likely to be resistant to tamoxifen, resulting in the development of...