News

[erdman, bolton, wallig]

Paper: Enzyme That Digests Vitamin A Also May Regulate Testosterone Levels

Dec 7, 2016 / Pathobiology

John Erdman Jr., Eric Bolton, and Matthew Wallig An enzyme that converts the dietary carotenoid beta carotene into vitamin A in the body may also regulate testosterone levels and growth of the prostate, a new study found. Scientists at the University of Illinois explored the impact of the enzyme Bco1 on testosterone levels and testosterone-sensitive...

[William Witola - C. parvum]

New Approach to Tackling Parasitic Disease Attracts Funding

Nov 29, 2016 / General News

As a young veterinarian in Zambia, Dr. William Witola wanted to know why the baby cows he saw were dying from a parasite resisting all treatment. Decades later, the University of Illinois Veterinary Medicine researcher is designing small molecules to silence that same parasite’s gene expression, find potential drug targets and help end a disease...

[tamoxifen study leaders]

Scientists Identify Genes That Disrupt Response to Breast Cancer Treatment

Sep 7, 2016 / Pathobiology

Scientists may have unlocked the genetic code that determines why many patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer fail to respond to the widely used drug tamoxifen. Patients who have higher levels of several nuclear transport genes – particularly the protein XPO1 – are more likely to be resistant to tamoxifen, resulting in the development of...

[Robin Holland and her dog on the UI quad]

NIH Award Broadens Impact for DVM-PhD Student

Apr 11, 2016 / Pathobiology

Federal Award Advances Clinician-Scientist Careers Robin Holland, a student in the Veterinary Medical Scholars Program at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, has been awarded a highly competitive and prestigious fellowship from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support her training for a career in research. Holland received an NIH Ruth L....

[Dr. Elizabeth Driskell and Clyde, a golden retriever, in an exam room]

Seeking a Faster Way to Catch the Kennel Cough Culprit

Apr 8, 2015 / Pathobiology

A cough, runny nose, fever, and lethargy. In dogs, these are classic signs of highly infectious upper respiratory problems that are lumped under the broad term “kennel cough.” The specific pathogen causing kennel cough may be viral, bacterial, or a combination of these. Because many different pathogens cause kennel cough, laboratory testing is required to...

[slide showing infected cell producing interferons]

Taking Aim at Arteriviruses: Targets for a Better Vaccine

Mar 12, 2015 / Pathobiology

Arteriviruses in pigs, horses, mice, and apes appear to use the same non-specific protein to evade the body’s immune system From the common cold to HIV, many illnesses—in fact, more than 90 percent of human illnesses—are caused by viruses. In the war against viruses, medical researchers called virologists are constantly seeking new avenues of attack. Vaccinations...

[C.L.Davis Path Course participants at Illinois]

Pathobiology Hosts National Review Course

Jun 18, 2014 / Pathobiology

The University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine was selected to host the Charles Louis Davis DVM Foundation’s annual descriptive course for pathology residents in 2014. Drs. Elizabeth Driskell, Stephane Lezmi, and Matt Wallig, all of the Department of Pathobiology, were the local course organizers. In June more than sixty participants came to the Urbana...